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International Migration and Development: A review in light of the crisis

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  • Jose Antonio Alonso

Abstract

Increasing international migratory flows in the last four decades is one of the most visible manifestations of the globalization process. In spite of its potential positive effect on global efficiency and well-being, little progress has been made in designing and promoting a normative and institutional framework to allow a better global governance of international migration. The current crisis has added new concerns in relation to migrant situation particularly in the countries more affected by the recession. It is likely that migratory pressures continue beyond the crisis, as international asymmetries that promote international migration have not been overcome.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose Antonio Alonso, 2011. "International Migration and Development: A review in light of the crisis," CDP Background Papers 011, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
  • Handle: RePEc:une:cpaper:011
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    File URL: http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/cdp/cdp_background_papers/bp2011_11e.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal & Selmi, Refk, 2014. "Brain Drain or Brain Gain? The case of Moroccan Students in France," MPRA Paper 56630, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Witada Anukoonwattaka & Adam Heal, 2013. "Regional Integration and Labour Mobility," Studies in Trade and Investment 81, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).
    3. A. Ncube & Yonas T. Bahta & A. J. Jordaan, 2020. "Job Market Perceptions of African Migrant Women in South Africa as an Initial and Long-Term Coping and Adaptation Mechanism," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 1165-1185, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration; labour markets; mobility of labour; development; migrants?remittances; human capital; brain drain; immigration policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J83 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Workers' Rights
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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