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Migration of Seasonal Agricultural Workers

Author

Listed:
  • Jeffrey M. Perloff
  • Lori Lynch
  • Susan M. Gabbard

Abstract

Nearly half of all seasonal farm workers migrate at least 75 miles in a given year. An expected earnings differential from migration weakly induces migration: a 10% earnings differential raises the probability of migrating by slightly more than 1%. This result indicates that there are substantial costs to migrating and that employers must offer large earnings premia to induce a substantial number of workers to move to their jobs. Some demographic groups earn substantially higher earnings by migrating. These higher earnings from migration are primarily due to higher wages rather than more hours of work. Copyright 1998, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey M. Perloff & Lori Lynch & Susan M. Gabbard, 1998. "Migration of Seasonal Agricultural Workers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(1), pages 154-164.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:80:y:1998:i:1:p:154-164
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/3180277
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    Cited by:

    1. Iwai, Nobuyuki & Emerson, Robert D. & Walters, Lurleen M., 2006. "Farm Employment Transitions: A Markov Chain Analysis with Self-Selectivity," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21353, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Temel, Tugrul, 2011. "Are the U.S. farm wages equalizing? Markov chain approach," MPRA Paper 31930, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Maoyong Fan & Susan Gabbard & Anita Alves Pena & Jeffrey M. Perloff, 2015. "Why Do Fewer Agricultural Workers Migrate Now?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(3), pages 665-679.
    4. Sreejith Aravindakshan & Frederick Rossi & T. S. Amjath-Babu & Prakashan Chellattan Veettil & Timothy J. Krupnik, 2018. "Application of a bias-corrected meta-frontier approach and an endogenous switching regression to analyze the technical efficiency of conservation tillage for wheat in South Asia," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 153-171, June.
    5. T. O Ojo & L.J. S Baiyegunhi & A. O Salami, 2019. "Impact of Credit Demand on the Productivity of Rice Farmers in South West Nigeria," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 11(1), pages 166-180.
    6. Jose Antonio Alonso, 2011. "International Migration and Development: A review in light of the crisis," CDP Background Papers 011, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.

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