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International Migration, Economic Development and Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Ça?lar Özden
  • Maurice Schiff

Abstract

This volume reflects the expansion of the World Bank Research Program on International Migration and Development into new substantive and geographic areas. It presents a new global migration database and includes studies of the determinants and impact of return and circular migration, the impact of the flow of ideas on fertility, host country policies and their impact on immigrants, and the impact of international migration and remittances on poverty and other development indicators. The studies cover countries from Latin America, North Africa, South Asia, the South Pacific, and Western Europe, and show that the impact of migration on education and health tends to benefit girls more than boys, that its impact on labor force participation tends to be stronger for women than men, that return migrants tend to do better than non-migrants, and that fertility has tended to decline in countries whose migration has been to the West and has failed to do so in countries whose migration has been to the Gulf. The purpose of the case studies is to illustrate and clarify many theoretical mechanisms and to advance understanding of the impact of different migration policies, given that introducing policy variables in econometric regressions is generally difficult. Each study in this volume aims to answer a variety of development- and policy-related questions using the most appropriate of these three methodologies. These empirical studies and analyses include exploration of some novel hypotheses; they are also new in terms of the topics selected and the regions/ countries examined

Suggested Citation

  • Ça?lar Özden & Maurice Schiff, 2007. "International Migration, Economic Development and Policy," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6766, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6766
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/6766/405230Intl0mig101OFFICIAL0USE0ONLY1.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G, 2002. "What Fundamentals Drive World Migration?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3559, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Lena Nekby, 2006. "The emigration of immigrants, return vs onward migration: evidence from Sweden," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(2), pages 197-226, June.
    3. Kit-Chun Lam, 1994. "Outmigration of Foreign-Born Members in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(2), pages 352-370, May.
    4. World Bank, 2006. "World Development Indicators 2006," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 8151, July.
    5. DaVanzo, Julie, 1983. "Repeat Migration in the United States: Who Moves Back and Who Moves On?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(4), pages 552-559, November.
    6. Jennifer Hook & Weiwei Zhang & Frank D. Bean & Jeffrey S. Passel, 2006. "Foreign-born emigration: A new approach and estimates based on matched CPS files," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(2), pages 361-382, May.
    7. Marcela Cerrutti & Douglas Massey, 2001. "On the auspices of female migration from Mexico to the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(2), pages 187-200, May.
    8. Patricia Reagan & Randall Olsen, 2000. "You can go home again: Evidence from longitudinal data," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(3), pages 339-350, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maurice Schiff & Yanling Wang, 2013. "North--South Trade-related Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth: Are Small States Different?," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 399-414, September.
    2. Ronald Skeldon, 2008. "International Migration as a Tool in Development Policy: A Passing Phase?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(1), pages 1-18.
    3. Huang, Bihong & Lian, Yujun & Li, Wensu, 2016. "How far is Chinese left-behind parents' health left behind?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 15-26.
    4. Randall Kuhn & Bethany Everett & Rachel Silvey, 2011. "The Effects of Children’s Migration on Elderly Kin’s Health: A Counterfactual Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 183-209, February.
    5. Ahmed, S. Amer & Vargas Da Cruz,Marcio Jose & Quillin,Bryce Ramsey & Schellekens,Philip, 2016. "Demographic change and development : a global typology," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7893, The World Bank.
    6. Carol Chan, 2014. "Gendered Morality and Development Narratives: The Case of Female Labor Migration from Indonesia," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(10), pages 1-24, October.
    7. Okoye, Dozie, 2016. "Can brain drain be good for human capital growth? Evidence from cross-country skill premiums and education costs," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 74-99.

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