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International Migration as a Tool in Development Policy: A Passing Phase?

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  • Ronald Skeldon

Abstract

This essay examines the recent emergence of migration and development as a major area of policy concern. The focus up to now has been almost entirely upon international migration, which accounts for the minority of people who move. A consensus has emerged that migration can be managed so as to promote development, and the essay critically assesses three of the major areas of concern: remittances, skilled migration, and the diaspora. While welcoming the growing acceptance that migration is no longer seen as negative for development, the essay cautions against essentializing migration and placing too great a responsibility upon migrant agency at the expense of the institutional change necessary to bring about development. Internal as well as international migrations will need to be integrated into any development framework, and it is further argued that these migrations are essentially a consequence of development. Planning for migration as an outcome rather than a cause of development is likely to provide a more balanced policy approach. Copyright (c) 2008 The Population Council, Inc..

Suggested Citation

  • Ronald Skeldon, 2008. "International Migration as a Tool in Development Policy: A Passing Phase?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(1), pages 1-18.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:34:y:2008:i:1:p:1-18
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ça?lar Özden & Maurice Schiff, 2006. "International Migration, Remittances, and the Brain Drain," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6929.
    2. Undp, 2003. "HDR 2003 - Millennium Development Goals: A Compact Among Nations to End Human Poverty," Human Development Report (1990 to present), Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), number hdr2003, December.
    3. Ça?lar Özden & Maurice Schiff, 2007. "International Migration, Economic Development and Policy," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6766.
    4. Samuel Munzele Maimbo & Dilip Ratha, 2005. "Remittances: Development Impact and Future Prospects," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7339.
    5. Michael Clemens, 2007. "Do Visas Kill? Health Effects of African Health Professional Emigration," Working Papers 114, Center for Global Development.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ziesemer, Thomas H.W., 2010. "The impact of the credit crisis on poor developing countries: Growth, worker remittances, accumulation and migration," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1230-1245, September.
    2. Bove, Vincenzo & Elia, Leandro, 2017. "Migration, Diversity, and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 227-239.
    3. Cristian ÎNCALTARAU & Sorin-Stefan MAHA & Liviu-George MAHA, 2011. "A Broader Look on Migration: A Two Way Interaction Between Development and Migration in the Country Of Origin," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 8, pages 285-297, December.
    4. Thomas Ziesemer, 2011. "Growth with endogenous migration hump and the multiple, dynamically interacting effects of aid in poor developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(30), pages 4865-4878.
    5. Ivlevs, Artjoms & Nikolova, Milena & Graham, Carol Lee, 2018. "Emigration, Remittances and the Subjective Well-Being of Those Staying Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 11437, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Sugata Marjit & Biswajit Mandal, 2016. "International Trade, Migration and Unemployment – The Role of Informal Sector," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(1), pages 8-22, March.
    7. repec:bla:tvecsg:v:108:y:2017:i:2:p:175-189 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Chakra P. Acharya & Roberto Leon-Gonzalez, 2016. "International Remittances, Rural-Urban Migration, and the Quest for Quality Education: The Case of Nepal," GRIPS Discussion Papers 15-25, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    9. Jessica Audrey Clayton & Thierry Warin, 2010. "A Note on Remittances in El Salvador and Ecuador: An Analysis of Household Survey Data," CIRANO Working Papers 2010s-13, CIRANO.
    10. Ziesemer, Thomas H.W., 2012. "Worker remittances, migration, accumulation and growth in poor developing countries: Survey and analysis of direct and indirect effects," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 103-118.
    11. Joris Schapendonk, 2013. "From Transit Migrants to Trading Migrants: Development Opportunities for Nigerians in the Transnational Trade Sector of Istanbul," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(7), pages 1-18, June.
    12. repec:dgr:unumer:2008063 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Sinem Yilmaz, 2016. "Migration of highly educated Belgian and Dutch Turks: ‘YoungBrains’ofTurkey," Border Crossing, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 6(2), pages 305-324, December.
    14. Susan Thieme & Anita Ghimire, 2014. "Making Migrants Visible in Post-MDG Debates," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-17, January.
    15. Kyoko Shinozaki, 2014. "Dossier: Institutions and skilled mobility. Guest Editors: Gery Nijenhuis & Maggi W.H. Leung," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 105(5), pages 526-541, December.
    16. Rafael Domínguez Martín, 2009. "Migraciones, Desigualdad y Desarrollo en los Estados de México," Documentos de trabajo sobre cooperación y desarrollo 200902, Cátedra de Cooperación Internacional y con Iberoamérica (COIBA), Universidad de Cantabria.

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