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Remittances: Development Impact and Future Prospects

  • Samuel Munzele Maimbo
  • Dilip Ratha

Remittances explores policy options for enhancing the poverty alleviation impact of remittance money in recipient countries, and addressees concerns about increasing migration and inequality. It looks at new technologies that allow remittance service providers to reduce direct transaction costs and open new channels, enhancing convenience for remitters and improving levels of transparency and accountability for regulators and policy makers. Importantly, it also establishes a baseline for further research and collaborative effort, showing the areas where the international financial institutions, particularly the World Bank, can add value to enhance the positive impact of remittance flows and minimize less welcome effects.

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This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 7339 and published in 2005.
ISBN: 978-0-8213-5794-1
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:7339
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  1. Reimer, Jeffrey J., 2002. "Estimating the poverty impacts of trade liberalization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2790, The World Bank.
  2. Desai, Mihir A. & Kapur, Devesh & McHale, John & Rogers, Keith, 2009. "The fiscal impact of high-skilled emigration: Flows of Indians to the U.S," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 32-44, January.
  3. Harm Zebregs & Wanda Tseng, 2002. "Foreign Direct Investment in China: Some Lessons for Other Countries," IMF Policy Discussion Papers 02/3, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Winters, L. Alan, 2000. "Trade, Trade Policy and Poverty: What Are The Links?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2382, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Ketkar, Suhas & Ratha, Dilip, 2001. "Development financing during a crisis : securitization of future receivables," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2582, The World Bank.
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