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World Bank Economists' Forum : Volume 1

Author

Listed:
  • Shantayanan Devarajan
  • F. Halsey Rogers
  • Lyn Squire

Abstract

The first World Bank Economists' Forum was held on May 3-4, 1999. The forum attempts to answer these questions: How do you recognize a hidden fiscal crisis? When capital flows are volatile, what types of policy announcements can help fend off currency crises? Do government training programs for unemployed workers have an effect? What infrastructure investments reduce infant mortality? This book collects nine outstanding papers presented at the forum. The main theme surveyed in this book include fiscal policy, capital flows, trade, decentralization, labor markets, infrastructure, health, and worker training. The second volume collects eight more papers, concerned with household behavior and health, communities and welfare, local governments and basic services, and firms and governments under uncertainty.

Suggested Citation

  • Shantayanan Devarajan & F. Halsey Rogers & Lyn Squire, 2001. "World Bank Economists' Forum : Volume 1," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13871, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:13871
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    2. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
    3. Demery, Lionel & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "Macroeconomic Adjustment and Poverty in Africa: An Emerging Picture," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 39-59, February.
    4. Alberini, Anna & Eskeland, Gunnar S. & Krupnick, Alan & McGranahan, Gordon, 1996. "Determinants of diarrheal disease in Jakarta," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1568, The World Bank.
    5. Alan Gilbert, 1993. "Third World Cities: The Changing National Settlement System," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 30(4-5), pages 721-740, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bosch, Mariano & Goni, Edwin & Maloney, William, 2007. "The determinants of rising informality in Brazil : Evidence from gross worker flows," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4375, The World Bank.
    2. Garima Vasishtha & Taimur Baig & Manmohan S. Kumar & Edda Zoli, 2006. "Fiscal and Monetary Nexus in Emerging Market Economies; How Does Debt Matter?," IMF Working Papers 2006/184, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Quentin Wodon & Rodrigo Castro & Kihoon Lee, 2001. "Poverty in Latin America: Trends (1986-1998) and Determinants," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 38(114), pages 127-153.
    4. Wilson Au-Yeung & Jason McDonald & Amanda Sayegh, 2006. "Australian Government Balance Sheet Management," NBER Working Papers 12302, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Janina León, 2012. "Calificación y Seguridad Social de la Mano de Obra en México," Working Papers 0612, Universidad Iberoamericana, Department of Economics.
    6. Martin Rama, 2002. "Mondialisation, inégalités et politiques de l'emploi," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 10(1), pages 43-83.
    7. Bales, Sarah & Rama, Martin, 2001. "Are public sector workers underpaid? - Appropriate comparators in a developing country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2747, The World Bank.

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