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Preferential Trade Arrangements: Impacts On Agricultural Trade And Income

  • Skripnitchenko, Anatoliy
  • Beladi, Hamid
  • Koo, Won W.

In this article, we focus on the effects of preferential trade arrangements on agricultural trade and agricultural income. Given the large number of preferential trade arrangements and complex interactions among them, we attempt to discover whether preferential trade arrangements are beneficial to agricultural trade and income, and are an effective tool to liberalize agricultural trade. The findings suggest that preferential trade arrangements with some exceptions tend to expand agricultural trade and improve agricultural income.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/23555
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Paper provided by North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics in its series Agribusiness & Applied Economics Report with number 23555.

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Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:nddaae:23555
Contact details of provider: Postal: PO Box 5636, Fargo, ND 58105-5636
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Web page: http://www.ext.nodak.edu/homepages/aedept/
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  1. Christopher F Baum & Mark E. Schaffer & Steven Stillman, 2002. "Instrumental variables and GMM: Estimation and testing," North American Stata Users' Group Meetings 2003 05, Stata Users Group.
  2. Thursby, Jerry G & Thursby, Marie C, 1987. "Bilateral Trade Flows, the Linder Hypothesis, and Exchange Risk," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(3), pages 488-95, August.
  3. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
  4. Nicita, Alessandro & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 2001. "Trade and production, 1976-99," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2701, The World Bank.
  5. Robert C. Feenstra & James R. Markusen & Andrew K. Rose, 2001. "Using the gravity equation to differentiate among alternative theories of trade," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 430-447, May.
  6. Anderson, James E, 1979. "A Theoretical Foundation for the Gravity Equation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 106-16, March.
  7. Ghosh, Sucharita & Yamarik, Steven, 2004. "Are regional trading arrangements trade creating?: An application of extreme bounds analysis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 369-395, July.
  8. Irwin, Douglas A. & Tervio, Marko, 2002. "Does trade raise income?: Evidence from the twentieth century," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 1-18, October.
  9. Jeffrey A. Frankel & Andrew K. Rose, 2000. "Estimating the Effect of Currency Unions on Trade and Output," NBER Working Papers 7857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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