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Socioeconomic Determinants of Children's Health in Russia: A Longitudinal Study

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  • Fedorov, Leonid
  • Sahn, David E

Abstract

This article explores dynamic links among the health status of children, measured by standardized height, socioeconomic characteristics of their parents and communities, and related shocks, using a 4-period-long panel of children from Russia's Longitudinal Monitoring Survey. Specific attention is given to the endogenous effect of lagged height on current height, which can be thought of as the catch-up effect or the lingering effect of poor health. We find that while such an effect is significant, it is substantially smaller than that typically found in the literature. It is also shown that exploring the dynamic relationship between health and socioeconomic factors allows for a better understanding of the impacts of time-varying socioeconomic variables on child growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Fedorov, Leonid & Sahn, David E, 2005. "Socioeconomic Determinants of Children's Health in Russia: A Longitudinal Study," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(2), pages 479-500, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2005:v:53:i:2:p:479-500
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/425378
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    Cited by:

    1. Lori L. Taylor, 2010. "Competition And Teacher Pay," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(3), pages 603-620, July.
    2. repec:spr:izalbr:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-017-0055-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Steckel, Richard H., 2009. "Heights and human welfare: Recent developments and new directions," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 1-23, January.
    4. Subha Mani, 2012. "Is there Complete, Partial, or No Recovery from Childhood Malnutrition? – Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 74(5), pages 691-715, October.
    5. Mangyo, Eiji, 2008. "The effect of water accessibility on child health in China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1343-1356, September.
    6. Fábio Augusto Reis Gomes & Ari Francisco de Araujo Junior & Márcio Antônio Salvato, 2006. "Mortalidade Infantil No Brasil E No Sudeste: Determinantes E Perspectivas Para O Futuro," Anais do XII Seminário sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 12th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais],in: João Antonio de Paula & et alli (ed.), Anais do XII Seminário sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 12th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais] Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
    7. Rieger, Matthias & Wagner, Natascha, 2015. "Child health, its dynamic interaction with nutrition and health memory – Evidence from Senegal," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 135-145.
    8. Rafael de Sousa Camelo & Priscilla Albuquerque Tavares & Carlos César Santejo Saiani, 2009. "Alimentação, Nutrição e Saúde em Programas de Transferência de Renda: Evidências para o Programa Bolsa Família," Economia, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics], vol. 10(4), pages 685-713.
    9. DeLoach, Stephen B. & Lamanna, Erika, 2011. "Measuring the Impact of Microfinance on Child Health Outcomes in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1808-1819.
    10. Costa-Font, Joan & Kossarova, Lucia, 2014. "Anthropometric dividends of Czechoslovakia’s break up," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60719, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. Kalle Hirvonen, 2013. "Measuring catch-up growth in malnourished populations," Working Paper Series 5913, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    12. Outes, Ingo & Porter, Catherine, 2013. "Catching up from early nutritional deficits? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 148-163.
    13. Daniela-Emanuela Danacica & Raluca Mazilescu, 2012. "Characteristics Of Long-Term Unemployment Spells In Romania," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 4, pages 122-129, December.
    14. Stillman, Steven, 2006. "Health and nutrition in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union during the decade of transition: A review of the literature," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 104-146, January.

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