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Macroeconomic Effects of Short-Term Training Measures on the Matching Process in Western Germany

Author

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  • Hujer, Reinhard

    () (Goethe University Frankfurt)

  • Zeiss, Christopher

    () (Goethe University Frankfurt)

Abstract

This paper investigates the macroeconomic effects of short term training measures on the matching processes in West Germany. The empirical analysis is based on regional data for local employment office districts for the period from January 2003 to December 2004. The empirical model relies on a dynamic version of a matching function augmented by short term training measures. In order to obtain consistent estimates in the presence of a dynamic panel data model and endogenous regressors, GMM estimation methods are applied.

Suggested Citation

  • Hujer, Reinhard & Zeiss, Christopher, 2006. "Macroeconomic Effects of Short-Term Training Measures on the Matching Process in Western Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 2489, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2489
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    2. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
    3. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173.
    4. Boeri, Tito & Burda, Michael C., 1996. "Active labor market policies, job matching and the Czech miracle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 805-817, April.
    5. Calmfors, Lars & Skedinger, Per, 1995. "Does Active Labour-Market Policy Increase Employment? Theoretical Considerations and Some Empirical Evidence from Sweden," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 91-109, Spring.
    6. Hujer, Reinhard & Thomsen, Stephan L. & Zeiss, Christopher, 2006. "The effects of short-term training measures on the individual unemployment duration in West Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 06-065, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    7. Richard Blundell & Stephen Bond & Frank Windmeijer, 2000. "Estimation in dynamic panel data models: improving on the performance of the standard GMM estimator," IFS Working Papers W00/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    8. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    9. Stephen Bond & Frank Windmeijer, 2002. "Finite sample inference for GMM estimators in linear panel data models," CeMMAP working papers CWP04/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    10. repec:hhs:iuiwop:429 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Ahn, Seung C. & Schmidt, Peter, 1995. "Efficient estimation of models for dynamic panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 5-27, July.
    12. Frank Windmeijer, 2000. "A finite sample correction for the variance of linear two-step GMM estimators," IFS Working Papers W00/19, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    13. Lehmann,Hartmut, 1995. "Active labor market policies in the OECD and in selected transition economies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1502, The World Bank.
    14. Nickell, Stephen J, 1981. "Biases in Dynamic Models with Fixed Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1417-1426, November.
    15. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eleftherios Goulas & Athina Zervoyianni, 2017. "Active labour-market policies and output growth - is there a causal relationship?," Working Paper series 17-20, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    2. Heyer, Gerd & Koch, Susanne & Stephan, Gesine & Wolff, Joachim, 2011. "Evaluation der aktiven Arbeitsmarktpolitik: Ein Sachstandsbericht für die Instrumentenreform 2011 (Evaluation of active labor market programs : a summary of recent results for the German program refor," IAB Discussion Paper 201117, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    3. Moritz Zöllner & Michael Fritsch & Michael Wyrwich, 2016. "An Evaluation of German Active Labor Market Policies and its Entrepreneurship Promotion," Jena Economic Research Papers 2016-022, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. Wapler, Rüdiger & Werner, Daniel & Wolf, Katja, 2014. "Active labour-market policies in Germany : do regional labour markets benefit?," IAB Discussion Paper 201428, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

    More about this item

    Keywords

    training measures; active labor market policy; panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General

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