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Socioeconomic Determinants of Child Health - Empirical Evidence from Indonesia

  • Subha Mani

    (Fordham University)

This paper characterizes the socioeconomic determinants of child health using height-for-age z-score (HAZ) - a long-run measure of chronic nutritional deficiency. We construct a panel data set that follows children between 3 and 59 months in 1993 through the 1997 and 2000 waves of the Indonesian Family Life Survey. We use this data to identify the various child level, household level and community level factors that affect children’s health. Our findings indicate that household income has a large and statistically significant role in explaining improvements in HAZ. We also find a strong positive association between parental height and HAZ. At the community level, we find that provision of electricity and availability of a paved road is positively associated with improvements in HAZ. Finally, in comparison to community level factors, household level characteristics have a large role in explaining the variation in HAZ. These findings suggest that policies that address the demand side constraints will have a greater potential to improve children's health outcomes in the future.

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File URL: http://legacy.fordham.edu/images/academics/Graduate_Schools/gsas/economics/DP2013_07_Mani.pdf
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Paper provided by Fordham University, Department of Economics in its series Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series with number dp2013-07.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:frd:wpaper:dp2013-07
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.fordham.edu/economics/
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  1. Thomas, D. & Strauss, J., 1997. "Health and Wages: Evidence on Men and Women in Urban Brazil," Papers 97-05, RAND - Reprint Series.
  2. Barrera, Albino, 1990. "The interactive effects of mother's scholling and unsupplemented breastfeeding on child health," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 81-98, November.
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  5. Behrman, Jere R. & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "Correlates and determinants of child anthropometrics in Latin America: background and overview of the symposium," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 335-351, December.
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  7. Thomas, Duncan & Strauss, John, 1992. "Prices, infrastructure, household characteristics and child height," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 301-331, October.
  8. Sahn, David E, 1994. "The Contribution of Income to Improved Nutrition in Cote d'Ivoire," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 3(1), pages 29-61, April.
  9. Hoddinott, John & Kinsey, Bill, 2001. " Child Growth in the Time of Drought," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 63(4), pages 409-36, September.
  10. Glick, Peter & Sahn, David E, 1998. "Maternal Labour Supply and Child Nutrition in West Africa," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(3), pages 325-55, August.
  11. John A. Maluccio & John Hoddinott & Jere R. Behrman & Reynaldo Martorell & Agnes R. Quisumbing & Aryeh D. Stein, 2009. "The Impact of Improving Nutrition During Early Childhood on Education among Guatemalan Adults," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(537), pages 734-763, 04.
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