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Gender Bias and The Indonesian Financial Crisis: Were Girls Hit Hardest?

  • David I. Levine

    (Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley)

  • Minnie Ames

    (Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, University of California, Berkeley)

We analyze how the financial crisis affected a wide range of investments in Indonesian children and children's outcomes including school enrollment, immunizations, and mortality. Our dataset is the National Socio-Economic Survey (Susenas), a large nationally representative sample. We build on past research by differentiating outcomes for boys and for girls, and by separating regions heavily affected by the financial crisis from others that were relatively unhurt. Along most dimensions, children were well protected. Contrary to some theory and press reports, girls did not fare worse than boys during the crisis.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/dev/papers/0407/0407005.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0407005.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 07 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0407005
Note: 30 pages
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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  1. Frankenberg, E. & Thomas, D. & Beegle, K., 1999. "The Real Costs of Indonesia's Economic Crisis: Preliminary Findings from the Indonesia Family Life Surveys," Papers 99-04, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  2. Thomas, Duncan & Beegle, Kathleen & Frankenberg, Elizabeth & Sikoki, Bondan & Strauss, John & Teruel, Graciela, 2004. "Education in a crisis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 53-85, June.
  3. Cameron, Lisa A & Worswick, Christopher, 2001. "Education Expenditure Responses to Crop Loss in Indonesia: A Gender Bias," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(2), pages 351-63, January.
  4. Elaina Rose, 1999. "Consumption Smoothing and Excess Female Mortality in Rural India," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(1), pages 41-49, February.
  5. Beegle, K. & Frankenberg, E. & Thomas, D., 1999. "Measuring Change in Indonesia," Papers 99-07, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
  6. Kevane, Michael & Levine, David I., 2003. "Changing Status of Daughters in Indonesia," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt0b52v28f, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
  7. Lisa A. Cameron, 2001. "The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa01/10, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  8. Behrman, Jere R, 1988. "Intrahousehold Allocation of Nutrients in Rural India: Are Boys Favored? Do Parents Exhibit Inequality Aversion?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(1), pages 32-54, March.
  9. Haddad, Lawrence & Hoddinott, John & Alderman, Harold & DEC, 1994. "Intrahousehold resource allocation : an overview," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1255, The World Bank.
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