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The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data

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  • Lisa A. Cameron

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of the Asian crisis on children in Indonesia. School attendance dropped slightly after the onset of the crisis but has since rebounded to higher than pre-crisis levels. Fewer children are now working, although the older children who are working and are not attending school seem to be working longer hours. Several studies have examined the social impacts of the crisis. The findings can largely be summarized as showing that rather than being uniformly negative and severe, the crisis impact has been quite heterogeneous, depending on geographic location and household socio-economic status. Overwhelmingly, households have been shown to be very resilient in the face of hardship.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa A. Cameron, 2001. "The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data," Papers inwopa01/10, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa01/10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Almas Heshmati, 2006. "Continental And Sub-Continental Income Inequality," The IUP Journal of Applied Economics, IUP Publications, vol. 0(1), pages 7-52, January.
    2. Kharisma, Bayu, 2017. "Idiosyncratic Shocks, Child Labor and School Attendance in Indonesia," MPRA Paper 78887, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 Apr 2017.
    3. Nicola Jones & Hannah Marsden, 2010. "Assessing the Impacts of and Response to the 1997-98 Asian Financial Crisis through a Child Rights Lens," Working papers 1002, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    4. David I. Levine & Minnie Ames, 2003. "Gender Bias and The Indonesian Financial Crisis: Were Girls Hit Hardest?," Development and Comp Systems 0303001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. L.Guarcello & S.Lyon & F.Rosati, 2004. "Impact of Working Time on Children’s Health," UCW Working Paper 12, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    6. Krisztina Kis-Katos & Robert Sparrow, 2011. "Child Labor and Trade Liberalization in Indonesia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(4), pages 722-749.
    7. Caroline Harper & Nicola Jones & Andy McKay, 2010. "Including Children in Policy Responses to Economic Crises," Working papers 1003, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    8. Marcel Fafchamps & Bart Minten, 2007. "Public Service Provision, User Fees and Political Turmoil," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(3), pages 485-518, June.
    9. O.O'Donnel & F.Rosati & E.van Doorslaer, 2002. "Child Labour and Health: Evidence and Research Issues," UCW Working Paper 1, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    10. Andy Sumner & Peter Edward, 2013. "From Low Income, High Poverty to High-Income, No Poverty? An Optimistic View of the Long-Run Evolution of Poverty in Indonesia By International Poverty Lines, 1984–2030," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 201310, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Jun 2013.
    11. Agus Priyambada & Asep Suryahadi & Sudarno Sumarto, 2005. "What Happened to Child Labor in Indonesia during the Economic Crisis : The Trade-off between School and Work," Labor Economics Working Papers 22535, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    12. Kis-Katos, Krisztina & Sparrow, Robert, 2009. "Child work and schooling under trade liberalization in Indonesia," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Frankfurt a.M. 2009 17, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    13. Andy Sumner, 2013. "The Evolution Of Education And Health Poverty During Economic Development:The Case Of Indonesia, 1991–2007," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 201311, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised May 2013.
    14. Lisa Cameron & Jenny Williams, 2009. "Is the relationship between socioeconomic status and health stronger for older children in developing countries?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(2), pages 303-324, May.
    15. Schady, Norbert R., 2002. "The (positive) effect of macroeconomic crises on the schoolingand employment decisions of children in a middle-income country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2762, The World Bank.
    16. Cameron, Lisa A., 2002. "Did social safety net scholarships reduce drop-out rates during the Indonesian economic crisis?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2800, The World Bank.
    17. Dasgupta, Basab & Ajwad, Mohamed Ihsan, 2011. "Income shocks reduce human capital investments : evidence from five east European countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5926, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child workers; economic development; economic monitoring; education; health;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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