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Integrating Economic and Social Policy: Good practices from high achieving countries

Author

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  • Santosh Mehrotra

Abstract

This paper examines the successes of ten 'high-achievers' - countries with social indicators far higher than might be expected given their national wealth. Their progress in such fields as education and health offers lessons for social policy elsewhere in the developing world. Based on UNICEF-supported studies in each country, the paper shows how, in the space of fifty years, these high-achievers have made advances in health and education that took nearly 200 years in the industrialized world. It pinpoints the policies that have contributed to this success - policies that could be replicated elsewhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Santosh Mehrotra, 2000. "Integrating Economic and Social Policy: Good practices from high achieving countries," Papers inwopa00/9, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa00/9
    Note: India Sri Lanka Malaysia
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bradbury, Bruce & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Micklewright, John, 2000. "Child poverty dynamics in seven nations," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-39, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. George Psacharopoulos, 1985. "Returns to Education: A Further International Update and Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 20(4), pages 583-604.
    3. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Richard Strickland, 1990. "Rural Differentiation, Poverty and Agricultural Crisis in sub-Saharan Africa: Toward an appropriate policy response," Papers iopeps90/48, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    4. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    5. Cathal O’Donoghue & Holly Sutherland, 1998. "Accounting for the Family: The treatment of marriage and children in European income tax systems," Papers iopeps98/25, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    6. Suraiya Ismail & John Micklewright, 1997. "Living Standards and Public Policy in Central Asia: What can be learned from child anthropometry?," Papers iopeps97/5, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    7. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    8. Olga Cantó Sanchez & Magda Mercader-Prats, 1998. "Child Poverty in Spain: What can be said?," Papers iopeps98/24, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    9. Magdalena Joos, 1995. "East Joins West: Child welfare and market reforms in the 'special case' of the former GDR," Papers iopeps95/18, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    10. Teimuraz Gogishvili & Joseph Gogodze & Amiran Tsakadze, 1996. "The Transition in Georgia: From collapse to optimism," Papers iopeps96/11, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    comparative analysis; economic development; educational programmes; health programmes; social development policies; social indicators;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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