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Child Poverty in English-Speaking Countries

  • John Micklewright

The paper considers child poverty in rich English-speaking countries - the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the U.K. and Ireland. It is sometimes assumed that these countries stand out from other OECD countries for their levels of child poverty. The paper looks at the policies they have adopted to address the problem. 'Poverty' is interpreted broadly and hence the available cross-national evidence on edicational disadvantage and teenage births is considered alongside that on low household income. Discussion of policy initiatives ranges across a number of areas of government activity.

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Paper provided by Innocenti Working Papers in its series Papers with number inwopa03/25.

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Length: 40
Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision: 2003
Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa03/25
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. David Piachaud & Holly Sutherland, 2000. "How Effective is the British Governments Attempt to Reduce Child Poverty?," CASE Papers case38, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
  2. Paul Gregg & Stephen Machin, 2000. "Child Development and Success or Failure in the Youth Labor Market," NBER Chapters, in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 247-288 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Suzie Ballantyne & Simon Chapple & David C. Maré & Jason Timmins, 2004. "Movements Into and Out of Child Poverty in New Zealand: Results from the Linked Income Supplement," HEW 0402001, EconWPA.
  4. John Micklewright, 2002. "Social Exclusion and Children: A European view for a US debate," Papers inwopa02/19, Innocenti Working Papers.
  5. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521004923 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Rebecca M. Blank, 2002. "Evaluating Welfare Reform in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1105-1166, December.
  7. Bale, Malcolm & Dale, Tony, 1998. "Public Sector Reform in New Zealand and Its Relevance to Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 13(1), pages 103-21, February.
  8. Marc Suhrcke & Sylke Schnepf & Gerry Redmond, 2002. "Attitudes to Inequality after Ten Years of Transition," Papers inwopa02/21, Innocenti Working Papers.
  9. Markus Jantti & Bruce Bradbury, 1999. "Child Poverty across Industrialized Nations," Papers iopeps99/70, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  10. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
  11. Micklewright, John, 1989. "Choice at Sixteen," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(221), pages 25-39, February.
  12. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521803106 is not listed on IDEAS
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