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Macroeconomics and Data on Children

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  • John Micklewright

Abstract

Putting data on children into macroeconomic debate can be achieved in a variety of ways. Economic policy is about improving the lives of people and the most basic data of all concerning children - demographic data - can be used to underline this fact. The key economic variables on which economic policy operates can all be given a child dimension. And direct measures of various dimensions of child well-being must also be brought into the picture.

Suggested Citation

  • John Micklewright, 2000. "Macroeconomics and Data on Children," Papers inwopa00/2, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa00/2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Richard Strickland, 1990. "Rural Differentiation, Poverty and Agricultural Crisis in sub-Saharan Africa: Toward an appropriate policy response," Papers iopeps90/48, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
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    4. Case, Anne & Deaton, Angus, 1998. "Large Cash Transfers to the Elderly in South Africa," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1330-1361, September.
    5. Bruce Bradbury & Markus Jantti, 1999. "Child Poverty across Industrialized Nations," Papers iopeps99/70, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    6. Anthony B. Atkinson, 1998. "EMU, Macroeconomics and Children," Papers iopeps98/39, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
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    11. Galina I. Gasyuk & Antonina P. Morova, 1995. "Economic Reforms and Family Well-being in Belarus: Caught between legacies and prospects," Papers iopeps95/12, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    12. Shelly J. Lundberg & Robert A. Pollak & Terence J. Wales, 1997. "Do Husbands and Wives Pool Their Resources? Evidence from the United Kingdom Child Benefit," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(3), pages 463-480.
    13. Teimuraz Gogishvili & Joseph Gogodze & Amiran Tsakadze, 1996. "The Transition in Georgia: From collapse to optimism," Papers iopeps96/11, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    child welfare; demographic indicators; economic policy;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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