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What is the Effect of Child Labour on Learning Achievement? Evidence from Ghana

  • Christopher Heady

This paper analyzes the links between child labour and poor school performance, using data gathered in Ghana in recent years. Author Christopher Heady moves away from conventional studies on child labour and education, which tend to focus on low school enrolment and attendance. He goes further, to examine the day to day impact of child labour on those in school, finding that, as well as leaving children too tired to learn, child labour robs them of their interest in learning. Children who are already contributing economically to their family income may be less interested in academic achievement, resulting in lack of motivation that affects both their learning and their future prospects.

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Paper provided by Innocenti Working Papers in its series Papers with number inwopa00/7.

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Length: 40
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa00/7
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  1. Alderman, Harold & Behrman, Jere R. & Khan, Shahrukh & Ross, David R. & Sabot, Richard, 1996. "Decomposing the regional gap in cognitive skills in rural Pakistan," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 49-76.
  2. Teimuraz Gogishvili & Joseph Gogodze & Amiran Tsakadze, 1996. "The Transition in Georgia: From collapse to optimism," Papers iopeps96/11, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  3. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Richard Strickland, 1990. "Rural Differentiation, Poverty and Agricultural Crisis in sub-Saharan Africa: Toward an appropriate policy response," Papers iopeps90/48, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  4. Bradbury, Bruce & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Micklewright, John, 2000. "Child poverty dynamics in seven nations," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-39, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  5. Harold Alderman & Jere R. Behrman & David R. Ross & Richard Sabot, 1996. "Decomposing the Gender Gap in Cognitive Skills in a Poor Rural Economy," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(1), pages 229-254.
  6. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 1997. "Family size, schooling and child labor in Peru - An empirical analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(4), pages 387-405.
  7. Hideo Akabayashi & George Psacharopoulos, 1999. "The trade-off between child labour and human capital formation: A Tanzanian case study," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 120-140.
  8. Robert Davies & Timothy Shaw & David Sanders, 1991. "Liberalisation for Development: Zimbabwe's adjustment without the fund," Papers iopeps91/42, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  9. Olga Cantó Sanchez & Magda Mercader-Prats, 1998. "Child Poverty in Spain: What can be said?," Papers iopeps98/24, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  10. Magdalena Joos, 1995. "East Joins West: Child welfare and market reforms in the 'special case' of the former GDR," Papers iopeps95/18, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  11. Christian Dustmann & John Mickelwright & Najma Rajah & Stephen Smith, 1996. "Earning and learning: educational policy and the growth of part-time work by full-time pupils," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(1), pages 79-103, February.
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