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East Joins West: Child welfare and market reforms in the 'special case' of the former GDR

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  • Magdalena Joos

Abstract

The collapse of communism in East Germany took place alongside unification with its democratic neighbour, West Germany. This made the East German experience of the ‘transition’ - from the planned to the free-market economy - unique among that of the post-socialist states. On the one hand, unification allowed East Germans to benefit from the resource and human capital of one of the world’s richest countries. On the other, the sudden bringing-together of two populations geared to different standards of living had a negative psychological impact among the poorer Easterners. This paper looks at how such specifics of the East German experience have influenced the development of policies and services for the country’s children.

Suggested Citation

  • Magdalena Joos, 1995. "East Joins West: Child welfare and market reforms in the 'special case' of the former GDR," Papers iopeps95/18, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:iopeps:iopeps95/18
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Santosh Mehrotra, 2000. "Integrating Economic and Social Policy: Good practices from high achieving countries," Papers inwopa00/9, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Aline Coudouel & John Micklewright & Sheila Marnie, 1998. "Targeting Social Assistance in a Transition Economy: the Mahallas in Uzbekistan," Papers iopeps98/4, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    3. Peter Galasi, 1998. "Income Inequality and Mobility in Hungary 1992-96," Papers iopeps98/3, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic Policy Series.
    4. Christopher Heady, 2000. "What is the Effect of Child Labour on Learning Achievement? Evidence from Ghana," Papers inwopa00/7, Innocenti Working Papers.
    5. Lisa Cameron, 2001. "The Impact Of The Indonesian Financial Crisis On Children: An Analysis Using The 100 Villages Data," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 43-64.
    6. Lisa A. Cameron, 2001. "An Analysis of the Role of Social Safety Net Scholarships in Reducing School Drop-Out during the Indonesian Economic Crisis," Papers inwopa01/11, Innocenti Working Papers.
    7. Sylke Schnepf, 2002. "A Sorting Hat that Fails? The transition from primary to secondary school in Germany," Papers inwopa02/22, Innocenti Working Papers.
    8. Santosh Mehrotra, 2001. "The Rhetoric of International Development Targets and the Reality of Official Development Assistance," Papers inwopa01/14, Innocenti Working Papers.
    9. Michaela Kreyenfeld, 2002. "Crisis or adaptation reconsidered: a comparison of East and West German fertility patterns in the first six years after the ´Wende´," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-032, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child welfare; economic transition; standard of living;

    JEL classification:

    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects

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