IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Outcomes of Teenage Motherhood in Europe


  • Richard Berthoud
  • Karen Robson


Research in many countries has confirmed that teenage mothers and their families are often at a disadvantage compared with those whose children are born in their twenties or thirties. But there has never been an opportunity for a systematic comparison between countries, based on a common data source. This paper analyses the current situation of women whose first child was born when they were teenagers, across 13 countries in the European Union, based on the European Community Household Panel survey. Outcomes considered include educational attainment, family structure, family employment and household income. Teenage mothers were disadvantaged in all countries, but the severity of their position varied substantially between countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Berthoud & Karen Robson, 2001. "The Outcomes of Teenage Motherhood in Europe," Papers inwopa01/16, Innocenti Working Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa01/16

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL:
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Saul Hoffman & E. Foster & Frank Furstenberg, 1993. "Reevaluating the costs of teenage childbearing: Response to Geronimus and Korenman," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(2), pages 291-296, May.
    2. David C. Ribar, 1999. "The socioeconomic consequences of young women's childbearing: Reconciling disparate evidence," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(4), pages 547-565.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Shaw, Mary & Lawlor, Debbie A. & Najman, Jake M., 2006. "Teenage children of teenage mothers: Psychological, behavioural and health outcomes from an Australian prospective longitudinal study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(10), pages 2526-2539, May.
    2. Jeni Klugman & John Micklewright & Gerry Redmond, 2002. "Poverty in the Transition: Social expenditures and the working-age poor," Papers inwopa02/18, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Rode, Sanjay, 2011. "Adolescent pregnancies and health issues in Uttar Pradesh: Some policy implications," MPRA Paper 32922, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 Aug 2011.
    4. John Micklewright, 2003. "Child Poverty in English-Speaking Countries," Papers inwopa03/25, Innocenti Working Papers, revised 2003.
    5. Alison J. Blaiklock & Cynthia A. Kiro & Michael Belgrave & Will Low & Eileen Davenport & Ian B. Hassall, 2002. "When the Invisible Hand Rocks the Cradle: New Zealand children in a time of change," Papers inwopa02/20, Innocenti Working Papers.
    6. Kiernan, Kathleen, 2003. "Cohabitation and divorce across nations and generations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6371, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Micklewright, John, 2002. "Social exclusion and children: a European view for a US debate," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6430, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Sylke Schnepf, 2002. "A Sorting Hat that Fails? The transition from primary to secondary school in Germany," Papers inwopa02/22, Innocenti Working Papers.
    9. Fabian Bornhorst & Simon Commander, 2005. "Integration and the Well-being of Children in the Transition Economies," Papers inwopa05/31, Innocenti Working Papers.
    10. Santosh Mehrotra & Mario Biggeri, 2002. "The Subterranean Child Labour Force: Subcontracted home-based manufacturing in Asia," Papers inwopa02/23, Innocenti Working Papers.
    11. Santosh Mehrotra & Mario Biggeri, 2002. "Social Protection in the Informal Economy: Home based women workers and outsourced manufacturing in Asia," Papers inwopa02/24, Innocenti Working Papers.

    More about this item


    family; motherhood; poverty; social problems; teenagers; women's status;

    JEL classification:

    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucf:inwopa:inwopa01/16. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Patrizia Faustini). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.