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The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Industrialised Countries

Editor

Listed:
  • Bradbury,Bruce
  • Jenkins,Stephen P.
  • Micklewright,John

Abstract

A child poverty rate of ten percent could mean that every tenth child is always poor, or that all children are in poverty for one month in every ten. Knowing where reality lies between these extremes is vital to understanding the problem facing many countries of poverty among the young. This unique study goes beyond the standard analysis of child poverty based on poverty rates at one point in time and documents how much movement into and out of poverty by children there actually is, covering a range of industrialised countries - the USA, UK, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Hungary and Russia. Five main topics are addressed: conceptual and measurement issues associated with a dynamic view of child poverty; cross-national comparisons of child poverty rates and trends; cross-national comparisons of children's movements into and out of poverty; country-specific studies of child poverty dynamics; and the policy implications of taking a dynamic perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Bradbury,Bruce & Jenkins,Stephen P. & Micklewright,John (ed.), 2001. "The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Industrialised Countries," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521004923, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521004923
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Smeeding, 2005. "Poor People in Rich Nations: The United States in Comparative Perspective," LIS Working papers 419, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    2. Stephen P. Jenkins & John Micklewright, 2007. "New Directions in the Analysis of Inequality and Poverty," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 700, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Elena Bárcena-Martín & M. Carmen Blanco-Arana & Salvador Pérez-Moreno, 2017. "Dynamics of child poverty in the European countries," Working Papers 437, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    4. Yekaterina Chzhen & Emilia Toczydlowska & Sudhanshu Handa & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2016. "Child Poverty Dynamics and Income Mobility in Europe," Papers inwopa840, Innocenti Working Papers.
    5. John Micklewright, 2003. "Child Poverty in English-Speaking Countries," Papers inwopa03/25, Innocenti Working Papers, revised 2003.
    6. Bruce Bradbury & Stephen P. Jenkins & John Micklewright, 2000. "Child Poverty Dynamics in Seven Nations," Papers inwopa00/8, Innocenti Working Papers.
    7. Timothy Smeeding & Jonathan Gershuny & Karen Robson & Coady Wing, 2009. "Income Poverty and Income Support for Minority and Immigrant Children in Rich Countries," LIS Working papers 527, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    8. Edwin Fourrier-Nicolai & Michel Lubrano, 2017. "Bayesian Inference for TIP curves: An Application to Child Poverty in Germany," Working Papers halshs-01494354, HAL.
    9. repec:eee:cysrev:v:76:y:2017:i:c:p:227-236 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Johan Fritzell & Veli-Matti Ritakallio, 2004. "Societal Shifts and Changed Patterns of Poverty," LIS Working papers 393, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    11. Micklewright, John, 2002. "Social exclusion and children: a European view for a US debate," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6430, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Timothy Smeeding & Teresa Munzi, 2017. "Conditions of Social Vulnerability, Work and Low Income, Evidence for Spain in Comparative Perspective," LIS Working papers 448, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    13. Timothy Smeeding & Teresa Munzi, 2005. "Poverty and Inequality: Greece and Mediterranean Europe in Comparative Perspective," LIS Working papers 421, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    14. Hjalmarsson, Simon & Mood, Carina, 2015. "Do poorer youth have fewer friends? The role of household and child economic resources in adolescent school-class friendships," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 201-211.
    15. Timothy Smeeding, 2005. "Causes and Conditions of Social Vulnerability in Comparative Perspective: Asian Evidence from the LIS Dataset," LIS Working papers 417, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    16. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:79-97 is not listed on IDEAS

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