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Public Sector Reform in New Zealand and Its Relevance to Developing Countries

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  • Bale, Malcolm
  • Dale, Tony

Abstract

Does New Zealand's success story have lessons for developing countries contemplating public sector reform? That question usually elicits one of two reactions, both inadvisable in the authors' view. The first reaction is to be impressed with the efficacy of the reforms and conclude that they should be adopted uncritically in other countries. The second reaction is that the special conditions existing in New Zealand are such that none of its reform experience is relevant to others. The authors take a middle position, maintaining that poorer countries can indeed extrapolate from the experience of their higher income neighbor despite the different conditions under which they have to operate. New Zealand's comprehensive overhaul of its public sector affords both general principles and specific elements relevant to countries looking to improve the quality, efficiency, and cost effectiveness of their public service sectors, and a careful analysis of those reforms can ascertain what might be transferable and what principles might apply. Copyright 1998 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Bale, Malcolm & Dale, Tony, 1998. "Public Sector Reform in New Zealand and Its Relevance to Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 13(1), pages 103-121, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:13:y:1998:i:1:p:103-21
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    1. Bendor, Jonathan, 1988. "Formal Models of Bureaucracy," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(03), pages 353-395, July.
    2. Richard A. Posner, 1974. "Theories of Economic Regulation," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 5(2), pages 335-358, Autumn.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rauch, James E. & Evans, Peter B., 2000. "Bureaucratic structure and bureaucratic performance in less developed countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 49-71, January.
    2. Wallis, Joe & Dollery, Brian, 2001. "Government Failure, Social Capital and the Appropriateness of the New Zealand Model for Public Sector Reform in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 245-263, February.
    3. Willy McCourt, 2007. "Impartiality through bureaucracy? A Sri Lankan approach to managing values," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 429-442.
    4. Fozzard, Adrian & Foster, Mick, 2001. "Changing Approaches to Public Expenditure Management in Low-income Aid Dependent Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 107, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Khaleghian, Peyvand & Gupta, Monica Das, 2005. "Public management and the essential public health functions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1083-1099, July.
    6. Barry Eichengreen & Ugo Panizza, 2016. "A surplus of ambition: can Europe rely on large primary surpluses to solve its debt problem?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 31(85), pages 5-49.
    7. John Micklewright, 2003. "Child Poverty in English-Speaking Countries," Papers inwopa03/25, Innocenti Working Papers, revised 2003.
    8. Alison J. Blaiklock & Cynthia A. Kiro & Michael Belgrave & Will Low & Eileen Davenport & Ian B. Hassall, 2002. "When the Invisible Hand Rocks the Cradle: New Zealand children in a time of change," Papers inwopa02/20, Innocenti Working Papers.
    9. Ian Lienert & Feridoun Sarraf, 2001. "Systemic Weaknesses of Budget Management in Anglophone Africa," IMF Working Papers 01/211, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Mccourt, Willy, 2012. "Can Top-Down and Bottom-Up be Reconciled? Electoral Competition and Service Delivery in Malaysia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(11), pages 2329-2341.
    11. Khaleghian, Peyvand & Das Gupta Monica, 2004. "Public management and essential public health functions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3220, The World Bank.
    12. Johnson, Robin W., 2000. "The Role of Institutions in Policy Formation and Delivery," 2000 Conference, August 13-18, 2000, Berlin, Germany 197206, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    13. McCourt, Willy, 2013. "Models of public service reform : a problem-solving approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6428, The World Bank.
    14. Chu, Ke-young, 2004. "A Model of a Rule of Law and a Rule of Man: Implications for the Design of Institutions," WIDER Working Paper Series 065, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    15. Adrian Fozzard & Mick Foster, 2010. "Changing Approaches to Public Expenditure Management in Low-income Aid Dependent Countries," Working Papers id:3145, eSocialSciences.

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