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Measuring the Impact of Microfinance on Child Health Outcomes in Indonesia

  • DeLoach, Stephen B.
  • Lamanna, Erika

Microfinance has become a staple of modern development policy as a means to facilitate anything from gender equality to growth. It can facilitate the sharing of health-related information among parents, promote the bargaining power of women in the household, aid in the development of important health-related infrastructure, and help households smooth consumption in the wake of unexpected economic shocks. Using data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey (1993–2000), we find that the presence of microfinance institutions in communities significantly improves the health of children.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 39 (2011)
Issue (Month): 10 ()
Pages: 1808-1819

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:10:p:1808-1819
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