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The Contribution of Income to Improved Nutrition in Cote d'Ivoire

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  • Sahn, David E

Abstract

This paper estimates a reduced form nutritional status function, that includes a linear combination of independent variables which explain the household's per capita consumption expenditures. Instrumented consumption expenditures are considered a good proxy for permanent income, and the findings indicate that they are an important determinant of long-term (or chronic) malnutrition. Income, however, does not have a significant effect on current (or acute) malnutrition. Mothers with more education will be less likely to have children who suffer from acute malnutrition when controlling for income levels. The education of the father, however, does not confer the same positive benefits upon his children's nutritional welfare, except as mediated through higher earnings. Parental height, especially of women, also has an important impact on long-term nutritional status. The characteristics of the village in which the household resides also play an important role in determining levels of malnutrition. Copyright 1994 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Sahn, David E, 1994. "The Contribution of Income to Improved Nutrition in Cote d'Ivoire," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 3(1), pages 29-61, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:3:y:1994:i:1:p:29-61
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas, Duncan & Lavy, Victor & Strauss, John, 1996. "Public policy and anthropometric outcomes in the Cote d'Ivoire," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 155-192.
    2. Subha Mani, 2012. "Is there Complete, Partial, or No Recovery from Childhood Malnutrition? – Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, pages 691-715.
    3. Simon Appleton & John Hoddinott & John MacKinnon, 1996. "Education and health in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 307-339.
    4. Subha Mani, 2008. "Is there Complete, Partial, or No Recovery from Childhood Malnutrition? Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2008-19, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
    5. DeLoach, Stephen B. & Lamanna, Erika, 2011. "Measuring the Impact of Microfinance on Child Health Outcomes in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, pages 1808-1819.
    6. Fedorov, Leonid & Sahn, David E, 2005. "Socioeconomic Determinants of Children's Health in Russia: A Longitudinal Study," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, pages 479-500.
    7. Marco d’Errico & Rebecca Pietrelli, 2017. "Resilience and child malnutrition in Mali," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, pages 355-370.
    8. Subha Mani, 2013. "Socioeconomic Determinants of Child Health - Empirical Evidence from Indonesia," Fordham Economics Discussion Paper Series dp2013-07, Fordham University, Department of Economics.
    9. Abdulai, Awudu & Aubert, Dominique, 2002. "Does Income Really Matter? Nonparametric and Parametric Estimates of the Demand for Calories in Tanzania," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24863, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Thomas, Duncan & Lavy, Victor & Strauss, John, 1996. "Public policy and anthropometric outcomes in the Cote d'Ivoire," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 155-192.
    11. Garrett, James L. & Ruel, Marie T., 1999. "Are determinants of rural and urban food security and nutritional status different?," FCND discussion papers 65, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Gibson, John, 2002. "The effect of endogeneity and measurement error bias on models of the risk of child stunting," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, pages 179-185.
    13. DeLoach, Stephen B. & Lamanna, Erika, 2011. "Measuring the Impact of Microfinance on Child Health Outcomes in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, pages 1808-1819.
    14. Gibson, John, 2001. "Literacy and Intrahousehold Externalities," World Development, Elsevier, pages 155-166.

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