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The effect of endogeneity and measurement error bias on models of the risk of child stunting

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  • Gibson, John

Abstract

The impact of endogeneity and measurement error on models that estimate the risk of child stunting is demonstrated. Stunting occurs when poor living environments cause short physical stature and is a major health problem in developing countries. The literature modelling the effect of various policies on the risk of stunting suffers from uncertainty about the strength of income versus maternal education effects. Results are based on a household survey from Papua New Guinea (PNG), where repeated within-year observations on households allow calculation of each variable’s reliability ratio. Both measurement error and endogeneity bias are shown to affect conclusions about whether raising incomes or maternal education is the best way to reduce the risk of stunting.

Suggested Citation

  • Gibson, John, 2002. "The effect of endogeneity and measurement error bias on models of the risk of child stunting," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 179-185.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:matcom:v:59:y:2002:i:1:p:179-185
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Duncan Thomas & John Strauss & Maria-Helena Henriques, 1991. "How Does Mother's Education Affect Child Height?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(2), pages 183-211.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rolando Morales & Ana María Aguilar & Alvaro Calzadilla, 2005. "Desnutrición en Bolivia: la geografía y la cultura sí importan," Research Department Publications 3186, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Rolando Morales & Ana María Aguilar & Alvaro Calzadilla, 2005. "Undernutrition in Bolivia: Geography and Culture Matter," Research Department Publications 3185, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Morales, Rolando & Aguilar, Ana Maria & Calzadilla, Alvaro, 2004. "Geography and culture matter for malnutrition in Bolivia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 373-390, December.

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    Keywords

    Endogeneity; Errors-in-variables; Stunting;

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