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Get real: an analysis of student preference for real food

Author

Listed:
  • Jennifer Porter

    () (The University of Vermont)

  • David Conner

    () (The University of Vermont)

  • Jane Kolodinsky

    () (The University of Vermont)

  • Amy Trubek

    () (Department of Nutrition & Food Sciences)

Abstract

Abstract The Real Food Challenge is a national student movement in the United States (U.S.) that aims to shift $1 billion—roughly 20%—of college and university food budgets across the country towards local, ecologically sound, fair, and humane food sources—what they call “real” food—by 2020. The University of Vermont (UVM) was the fifth university in the U.S. to sign the Real Food Campus Commitment, pledging to shift at least 20% of its own food budget towards “real” food by 2020. In order to examine student preference for “real” food on the UVM campus, we analyzed a survey of 904 undergraduate students that used contingent valuation to evaluate students’ willingness-to-pay (WTP) for the “real” attribute. We found that a majority of students are willing to pay a positive premium for “real” food. Furthermore, we found that student characteristics and attitudes significantly influence WTP. Specifically, gender, residency, college, and attitudes about price and origin of food are significant predictors of WTP.

Suggested Citation

  • Jennifer Porter & David Conner & Jane Kolodinsky & Amy Trubek, 2017. "Get real: an analysis of student preference for real food," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 34(4), pages 921-932, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:34:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10460-017-9785-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s10460-017-9785-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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