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Modern day slavery: What drives human trafficking in Europe?

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  • Hernandez, Diego
  • Rudolph, Alexandra

Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of human trafficking victim inflows into European countries based on identified victim numbers. We use a gravity-type model to acknowledge data reporting shortcomings. Our empirical results suggest that human trafficking occurs within well-established migrant and refugee corridors and that victims are more likely to be exploited in host countries with weak institutions. Legislation on prostitution activities does not influence victim inflows. Liberalization of border controls intensifies trafficking flows. We find no effect of host countries' acceptance rates of asylum seekers. We conclude that effective policies against human trafficking require sound institutions and a focus on the entire trafficking-chain/channel from source to host countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Hernandez, Diego & Rudolph, Alexandra, 2015. "Modern day slavery: What drives human trafficking in Europe?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 118-139.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:38:y:2015:i:c:p:118-139
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2015.02.002
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    Cited by:

    1. Magris, Francesco & Russo, Giuseppe, 2016. "Fiscal Revenues and Commitment in Immigration Amnesties," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 75-90.
    2. Sonnabend, Hendrik, 2015. "Good Intentions and Unintended Evil? Clients’ Punishment in the Market for Sex Services with Voluntary and Involuntary Providers," EconStor Preprints 110682, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    3. Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Martin Mulunda Kabange, 2016. "Slave trade and Human Trafficking," Working Papers 16/002, African Governance and Development Institute..

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human trafficking; Gravity model; Illegal migration; International organized crime;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • K14 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Criminal Law
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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