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How do high-skilled natives view high-skilled immigrants? A test of trade theory predictions

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  • O'Connell, Michael

Abstract

Trade theory suggests that natives with higher skills are more favourable to immigrants because immigrants, usually low-skilled, do not compete directly with them. What happens when immigrants are relatively high-skilled? Attitudes of respondents measured in the European Social Survey were examined. The coefficient between education and sentiment towards immigrants (while controlling for income and age) and its link with immigrant skill level of a country was assessed in a two-step analysis. No evidence to support trade theory predictions about high-skilled nationals' attitudes was found, probably because there are safeguards insulating high-skilled nationals from direct labour competition with high-skilled immigrants.

Suggested Citation

  • O'Connell, Michael, 2011. "How do high-skilled natives view high-skilled immigrants? A test of trade theory predictions," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 230-240, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:27:y:2011:i:2:p:230-240
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Who Is Against Immigration? A Cross-Country Investigation of Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 510-530, August.
    2. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Individual Attitudes towards Immigrants: Welfare-State Determinants Across Countries," Working Papers gueconwpa~06-06-02, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Kenneth F. Scheve & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2001. "Labor Market Competition And Individual Preferences Over Immigration Policy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 133-145, February.
    4. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Sinnott, Richard, 2006. "The determinants of individual attitudes towards immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 838-861, December.
    5. Tim Bale & Christoffer Green-Pedersen & André Krouwel & Kurt Richard Luther & Nick Sitter, 2010. "If You Can't Beat Them, Join Them? Explaining Social Democratic Responses to the Challenge from the Populist Radical Right in Western Europe," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 58, pages 410-426, June.
    6. Miguet, Florence, 2008. "Voting about immigration policy: What does the Swiss experience tell us?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 628-641, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hernandez, Diego & Rudolph, Alexandra, 2015. "Modern day slavery: What drives human trafficking in Europe?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 118-139.
    2. Libman, Alexander & Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten & Yadav, Gaurav, 2013. "Are human rights and economic well-being substitutes? The evidence from migration patterns across the Indian states," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 139-164.

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