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Slave trade and Human Trafficking

Author

Listed:
  • Oasis Kodila-Tedika

    () (Université de Kinshasa Département d’Eco)

  • Martin Mulunda Kabange

    () (University of KwaZulu-Natal)

Abstract

The literature has not sufficiently engaged in the emergence and expansion of the phenomenon of slave trade. This article estimates whether or not slave trade affects human trafficking using an Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) with standard errors that are consistent with heteroscedasticity. The paper also checks for the robustness of the OLS model. The findings of the paper reveal that the effect of slave trade on human trafficking is positive and statistically significant.The more one is exposed to the phenomenon of slave trade, the more human trafficking is important. The paper also deduces that developed countries that experienced slave trade record low level of human trafficking nowadays, while developing countries continue to record high level of human trafficking. Additionally, institutions werefound to be statistically very significant, and essential to be politically and socioeconomically consolidated and promoted, mainly in developing countries in order to alleviate the level of human trafficking.

Suggested Citation

  • Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Martin Mulunda Kabange, 2016. "Slave trade and Human Trafficking," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 16/002, African Governance and Development Institute..
  • Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:16/002
    as

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    File URL: http://www.afridev.org/RePEc/agd/agd-wpaper/Slave-trade-and-Human-traficfficking.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2016
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nathan Nunn, 2008. "The Long-term Effects of Africa's Slave Trades," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(1), pages 139-176.
    2. Bertocchi, Graziella & Dimico, Arcangelo, 2012. "The racial gap in education and the legacy of slavery," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 581-595.
    3. Graziella Bertocchi, 2016. "The legacies of slavery in and out of Africa," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-19, December.
    4. Avdan, Nazli, 2012. "Human trafficking and migration control policy: vicious or virtuous cycle?," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 171-205, December.
    5. Nathan Nunn & Leonard Wantchekon, 2011. "The Slave Trade and the Origins of Mistrust in Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3221-3252, December.
    6. Raymond Fisman & Edward Miguel, 2007. "Corruption, Norms, and Legal Enforcement: Evidence from Diplomatic Parking Tickets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(6), pages 1020-1048, December.
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    8. Warren Whatley & Rob Gillezeau, 2011. "The Impact of the Transatlantic Slave Trade on Ethnic Stratification in Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 571-576, May.
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    11. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2016. "Fighting African conflicts and crimes: which governance tools matter?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(5), pages 466-485, May.
    12. Louis Putterman, 2008. "Agriculture, Diffusion and Development: Ripple Effects of the Neolithic Revolution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 729-748, November.
    13. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2013. "Esclavagisme et colonisation : Quelles conséquences contemporaines en Afrique ? - Résumé critique des travaux de l'économiste Nathan Nunn
      [Slavery and colonization: What contemporary consequences i
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Trafficking; Slavery;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative

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