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Sex-hormone genes and gender difference in ultimatum game: Experimental evidence from China and Israel

  • Chew, Soo Hong
  • Ebstein, Richard P.
  • Zhong, Songfa
Registered author(s):

    Combining the methodologies of experimental economics and molecular genetics, we report a genetic association between sex-hormone genes and ultimatum game (UG) behavior in a discovery sample from China and a replication sample from Israel. The androgen receptor gene is found to be associated with UG responder behavior for male but not female subjects in the Chinese population, but this finding is not replicated in the Israeli sample. The estrogen receptor β gene is significantly associated with female UG responder behavior but not for male subjects in the Chinese sample. This finding is marginally replicated in the Israeli sample. Overall, our findings provide suggestive evidence on a gender specific relationship between sex-hormone genes and UG responder behavior, and can contribute to a deeper understanding of gender differences in fairness preference at the level of molecular genetics.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 90 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 28-42

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:90:y:2013:i:c:p:28-42
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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