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Where do all the windmills go? Influence of the institutional setting on the spatial distribution of renewable energy installation

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  • Pechan, A.

Abstract

Promoting renewable energy sources is one policy response to climate change. Not only is there currently a debate over the best policy instrument, it is also discussed whether the renewable energy production should be expanded centralized at locations with the highest production potential or decentralized close to load. It is yet not fully understood what influences the spatial distribution of renewable energy installation.

Suggested Citation

  • Pechan, A., 2017. "Where do all the windmills go? Influence of the institutional setting on the spatial distribution of renewable energy installation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 75-86.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:75-86
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2017.04.034
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:energy:v:147:y:2018:i:c:p:1203-1215 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Wind energy; Support scheme; Market design;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • D47 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Market Design

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