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Peak-load pricing with different types of dispatchability

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  • Klaus Eisenack

    () (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin)

  • Mathias Mier

    () (ifo Institute)

Abstract

Abstract We extend the theory of peak-load pricing by considering that the production with different technologies can be adjusted within their capacity at different speeds. In the established analysis, all production decisions can be made after the random variables realize. In our setting, in contrast, some decisions are made before, others after. This is important, e.g., when increasing capacities of renewables are integrated in electricity systems worldwide. We consider fixed load and three types of capacities: partially dispatchable capacity (e.g., nuclear power-plants) needs to be scheduled ahead of actual production, non-dispatchable capacity (e.g., wind turbines) produces randomly, and highly-dispatchable capacity (e.g., gas turbines) can instantly adjust. If capacities differ in their dispatchability, some standard results of peak-load pricing break down. For example, less capacity types will be employed. Either a system with partially dispatchable technologies only, or a system dominated by non-dispatchable technologies and supplemented by highly-dispatchables occurs. Non- and highly dispatchable technologies can be substitutes or complements. The probability of outage does not rise if non-dispatchable capacity becomes cheaper. In a system with non-dispatchables, capacity decisions cannot be decentralized by conventional markets because cost recovery is not possible. Thus, the integration of renewable electricity generators requires alternative market designs.

Suggested Citation

  • Klaus Eisenack & Mathias Mier, 2019. "Peak-load pricing with different types of dispatchability," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 105-124, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:56:y:2019:i:2:d:10.1007_s11149-019-09394-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s11149-019-09394-9
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    Cited by:

    1. Crampes, Claude & Renault, Jérôme, 2018. "Supply flexibility in electricity markets," TSE Working Papers 18-964, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    2. Neetzow, Paul & Pechan, Anna & Eisenack, Klaus, 2018. "Electricity storage and transmission: Complements or substitutes?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 367-377.
    3. Mathias Mier, 2018. "Policy Implications of a World with Renewables, Limited Dispatchability, and Fixed Load," Working Papers V-412-18, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cost recovery; Dispatchability; Energy transition; Flexibility; Market design; Peak-load pricing; Reliability; Renewables;

    JEL classification:

    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • L97 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Utilities: General
    • L98 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Government Policy
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General

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