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On the efficient market diffusion of intermittent renewable energies

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  • Helm, Carsten
  • Mier, Mathias

Abstract

Capacity costs of renewable energies have been decreasing dramatically and are expected to fall further, making them more competitive with fossils. Building on an analytically tractable peak-load pricing model, we analyze how intermittency of renewable energies affects the market diffusion that results from these lower costs. In particular, once renewables have become competitive by attaining the same levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) as fossils, the marginal increase in efficient capacities due to a further cost reduction varies substantially. Initially it is small, then it rises, but it falls again once renewable capacities are large enough to satisfy the whole electricity demand at times of high availability. If external costs of fossils are internalized by a Pigouvian tax, then perfect competition leads to efficient investments in renewable and fossil capacities; even though we assume that only a subgroup of consumers can adapt their demand to price fluctuations that are caused by the intermittency of renewables. Moreover, fossils receive a capacity payment through the market for their reliability in serving demand of non-reactive consumers. Maximum electricity prices rise with the share of renewables. If regulators impose a price cap, this initially raises investments in renewables, but the effect may reverse if the share of renewables is large.

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  • Helm, Carsten & Mier, Mathias, 2019. "On the efficient market diffusion of intermittent renewable energies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 812-830.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:80:y:2019:i:c:p:812-830
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2019.01.017
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    Cited by:

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    2. Carsten Helm & Mathias Mier, 2020. "Steering the Energy Transition in a World of Intermittent Electricity Supply: Optimal Subsidies and Taxes for Renewables Storage," ifo Working Paper Series 330, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    3. Meier, Felix D. & Quaas, Martin F., 2021. "Booming gas – A theory of endogenous technological change in resource extraction," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 107(C).
    4. Klaus Eisenack & Mathias Mier, 2019. "Peak-load pricing with different types of dispatchability," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 105-124, December.
    5. Heimvik, Arild & Amundsen, Eirik S., 2021. "Prices vs. percentages: Use of tradable green certificates as an instrument of greenhouse gas mitigation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C).
    6. Ambec, Stefan & Crampes, Claude, 2021. "Real-time electricity pricing to balance green energy intermittency," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C).
    7. Helm, Carsten & Mier, Mathias, 2021. "Steering the energy transition in a world of intermittent electricity supply: Optimal subsidies and taxes for renewables and storage," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 109(C).
    8. Singh, Preeti & Mudgal, Vijay & Khanna, Sourav & Mallick, Tapas K. & Reddy, K.S., 2020. "Experimental investigation of solar photovoltaic panel integrated with phase change material and multiple conductivity-enhancing-containers," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 205(C).
    9. Mier, Mathias & Weissbart, Christoph, 2020. "Power markets in transition: Decarbonization, energy efficiency, and short-term demand response," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C).
    10. Narita, Daiju & Requate, Till, 2021. "Price vs. quantity regulation of volatile energy supply and market entry of RES-E operators," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C).
    11. Neetzow, Paul, 2021. "The effects of power system flexibility on the efficient transition to renewable generation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 283(C).
    12. Yang, Yuting, 2020. "Electricity Interconnection with Intermittent Renewables," TSE Working Papers 20-1075, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    13. Tadeusz Skoczkowski & Sławomir Bielecki & Joanna Wojtyńska, 2019. "Long-Term Projection of Renewable Energy Technology Diffusion," Energies, MDPI, vol. 12(22), pages 1-24, November.
    14. Mathias Mier, 2020. "Efficient Pricing of Electricity Revisited," ifo Working Paper Series 342, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    15. Fridgen, Gilbert & Halbrügge, Stephanie & Olenberger, Christian & Weibelzahl, Martin, 2020. "The insurance effect of renewable distributed energy resources against uncertain electricity price developments," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    16. Davood Askarany & Hassan Yazdifar & Kevin Dow, 2021. "B2B Networking, Renewable Energy, and Sustainability," JRFM, MDPI, vol. 14(7), pages 1-13, June.
    17. Helm, Carsten & Mier, Mathias, 2019. "Subsidising Renewables but Taxing Storage? Second-Best Policies with Imperfect Carbon Pricing," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203539, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    18. Antweiler, Werner & Muesgens, Felix, 2021. "On the long-term merit order effect of renewable energies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewable energies; Peak-load pricing; Intermittent energy sources; Price caps; Energy transition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity

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