IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/eneeco/v43y2014icp63-71.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of heat waves on electricity spot markets

Author

Listed:
  • Pechan, Anna
  • Eisenack, Klaus

Abstract

Thermoelectric power plants depend on cooling water drawn from water bodies. Low river run-off and/or high water temperatures limit a plant's production capacity. This problem may intensify with climate change. Our study quantifies the impact of forced capacity reductions on market prices, production costs, consumer and producer surplus, as well as emissions by means of a bottom-up power generation system model. First, we simulate the German electricity spot market during the heat wave of 2006. Then we conduct a sensitivity study that accounts for future climatic and technological conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Pechan, Anna & Eisenack, Klaus, 2014. "The impact of heat waves on electricity spot markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 63-71.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:43:y:2014:i:c:p:63-71
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2014.02.006
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988314000231
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kristin Linnerud & Torben K. Mideksa & Gunnar S. Eskeland, 2011. "The Impact of Climate Change on Nuclear Power Supply," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 149-168.
    2. Alberini, Anna & Filippini, Massimo, 2011. "Response of residential electricity demand to price: The effect of measurement error," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 889-895, September.
    3. Weigt, Hannes & Hirschhausen, Christian von, 2008. "Price formation and market power in the German wholesale electricity market in 2006," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 4227-4234, November.
    4. Koch, Hagen & Vögele, Stefan, 2009. "Dynamic modelling of water demand, water availability and adaptation strategies for power plants to global change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 2031-2039, May.
    5. Mideksa, Torben K. & Kallbekken, Steffen, 2010. "The impact of climate change on the electricity market: A review," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3579-3585, July.
    6. Hoffmann, Bastian & Häfele, Sebastian & Karl, Ute, 2013. "Analysis of performance losses of thermal power plants in Germany – A System Dynamics model approach using data from regional climate modelling," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 193-203.
    7. Grant R. McDermott & Øivind A. Nilse, 2014. "Electricity Prices, River Temperatures, and Cooling Water Scarcity," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 90(1), pages 131-148.
    8. Florian Leuthold & Hannes Weigt & Christian Hirschhausen, 2012. "A Large-Scale Spatial Optimization Model of the European Electricity Market," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 75-107, March.
    9. Rolf Golombek & Sverre Kittelsen & Ingjerd Haddeland, 2012. "Climate change: impacts on electricity markets in Western Europe," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 113(2), pages 357-370, July.
    10. Kopsakangas Savolainen, Maria & Svento, Rauli, 2012. "Real-Time Pricing in the Nordic Power markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1131-1142.
    11. Mark Frank, 2003. "An Empirical Analysis of Electricity Regulation on Technical Change in Texas," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 22(4), pages 313-331, June.
    12. Sensfuß, Frank & Ragwitz, Mario & Genoese, Massimo, 2008. "The merit-order effect: A detailed analysis of the price effect of renewable electricity generation on spot market prices in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 3076-3084, August.
    13. Lijesen, Mark G., 2007. "The real-time price elasticity of electricity," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 249-258, March.
    14. Hagen Koch & Stefan Vögele & Michael Kaltofen & Uwe Grünewald, 2012. "Trends in water demand and water availability for power plants—scenario analyses for the German capital Berlin," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 110(3), pages 879-899, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Eisenack & Mathias Mier, 2019. "Peak-load pricing with different types of dispatchability," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 105-124, December.
    2. Ronald E. Stewart & Daniel Betancourt & James B. Davies & Deborah Harford & Yaheli Klein & Robert Lannigan & Linda Mortsch & Erin O’Connell & Kathy Tang & Paul H. Whitfield, 2017. "A multi-perspective examination of heat waves affecting Metro Vancouver: now into the future," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 87(2), pages 791-815, June.
    3. Santágata, Daniela M. & Castesana, Paula & Rössler, Cristina E. & Gómez, Darío R., 2017. "Extreme temperature events affecting the electricity distribution system of the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires (1971–2013)," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 404-414.
    4. Mosquera-López, Stephanía & Uribe, Jorge M. & Manotas-Duque, Diego F., 2018. "Effect of stopping hydroelectric power generation on the dynamics of electricity prices: An event study approach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 456-467.
    5. Eisenack, Klaus, 2016. "Institutional adaptation to cooling water scarcity for thermoelectric power generation under global warming," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 153-163.
    6. Bogmans, Christian W.J. & Dijkema, Gerard P.J. & van Vliet, Michelle T.H., 2017. "Adaptation of thermal power plants: The (ir)relevance of climate (change) information," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1-18.
    7. Totschnig, G. & Hirner, R. & Müller, A. & Kranzl, L. & Hummel, M. & Nachtnebel, H.-P. & Stanzel, P. & Schicker, I. & Formayer, H., 2017. "Climate change impact and resilience in the electricity sector: The example of Austria and Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 238-248.
    8. J. Micha Steinhäuser & Klaus Eisenack, 2015. "Spatial incidence of large-scale power plant curtailment costs," Working Papers V-379-15, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2015.
    9. Nahmmacher, Paul & Schmid, Eva & Pahle, Michael & Knopf, Brigitte, 2016. "Strategies against shocks in power systems – An analysis for the case of Europe," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 455-465.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Electricity market; Heat wave; Germany; Climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:43:y:2014:i:c:p:63-71. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.