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Does food insecurity at home affect non-cognitive performance at school? A longitudinal analysis of elementary student classroom behavior


  • Howard, Larry L.


This paper estimates models of the transitional effects of food insecurity experiences on children's non-cognitive performance in school classrooms using a panel of 4710 elementary students enrolled in 1st, 3rd, and 5th grade (1999-2003). In addition to an extensive set of child and household-level characteristics, we use information on U.S. counties to control for potential confounding effects of the local economic and noneconomic environment on children's household transitions between states of food insecurity and food security. The time horizon of our analysis affords insight into factors underlying children's formation of non-cognitive skills and the efficiency of classroom-based educational production in elementary school. Overall, we find significant negative developmental effects for children with food insecurity at home; and that children experiencing an early transition from food insecurity in 1st grade to food security in 3rd grade have even larger impairments that persist through 5th grade.

Suggested Citation

  • Howard, Larry L., 2011. "Does food insecurity at home affect non-cognitive performance at school? A longitudinal analysis of elementary student classroom behavior," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 157-176, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:30:y:2011:i:1:p:157-176

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kelly Stamper Balistreri, 2016. "A Decade of Change: Measuring the Extent, Depth and Severity of Food Insecurity," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 373-382, September.
    2. Daniel Millimet & Manan Roy, 2015. "Partial identification of the long-run causal effect of food security on child health," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 83-141, February.
    3. Miki Kohara & Yusuke Kamiya, 2016. "Maternal employment and food produced at home: evidence from Japanese data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 417-442, June.
    4. repec:bla:jconsa:v:51:y:2017:i:3:p:659-681 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Audrey Pereira & Sudhanshu Handa & Goran Holmqvist, 2017. "Prevalence and Correlates of Food Insecurity among Children across the Globe," Papers inwopa900, Innocenti Working Papers.
    6. Morrissey, Taryn W. & Oellerich, Don & Meade, Erica & Simms, Jeffrey & Stock, Ann, 2016. "Neighborhood poverty and children's food insecurity," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 85-93.
    7. Leos-Urbel, Jacob & Schwartz, Amy Ellen & Weinstein, Meryle & Corcoran, Sean, 2013. "Not just for poor kids: The impact of universal free school breakfast on meal participation and student outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 88-107.


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