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Simulating economic growth effects on food and nutrition security in Yemen: A new macro–micro modeling approach

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  • Breisinger, Clemens
  • Ecker, Olivier

Abstract

This paper presents an innovative approach for estimating changes in a country's food and nutrition security subject to economic growth and related income distribution over time. Specifically, we combine a dynamic computable general equilibrium model with household- and individual-level regression models and apply this macro–micro approach to assess the effects of Yemen's crisis-induced economic recession in 2011/12, together with two alternative transition scenarios from 2013 to 2020. Our results strongly suggest that not only more rapid, but also broader based economic growth will be needed for a quick return to pre-crisis food and nutrition security levels in Yemen. In addition to broader based growth that benefits the poor, targeted measures for improving nutrition such as integrated childcare programs and awareness campaigns related to family planning, female education, and qat consumption are needed.

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  • Breisinger, Clemens & Ecker, Olivier, 2014. "Simulating economic growth effects on food and nutrition security in Yemen: A new macro–micro modeling approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 100-113.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:43:y:2014:i:c:p:100-113
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2014.07.029
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    Cited by:

    1. Kun Cheng & Qiang Fu & Tianxiao Li & Qiuxiang Jiang & Wei Liu, 2015. "Regional food security risk assessment under the coordinated development of water resources," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 78(1), pages 603-619, August.
    2. Debowicz, Darío, 2016. "Does the microsimulation approach used in macro–micro modelling matter? An application to the distributional effects of capital outflows during Argentina's Currency Board regime," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 591-599.
    3. van Ruijven, Bas J. & O’Neill, Brian C. & Chateau, Jean, 2015. "Methods for including income distribution in global CGE models for long-term climate change research," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 530-543.
    4. Matteo Richiardi & John Cockburn & Hélène Maisonnave & Luca Tiberti, 2016. "Editorial," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 9(1), pages 1-4.

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