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Factor Intensities and Locational Linkages of Rural Consumption Patterns in Sierra Leone

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  • Robert P. King
  • Derek Byerlee

Abstract

An understanding of consumer behavior is important for the analysis of the effects of changes in income distribution on the development process. Factor intensities and locational linkages of consumption patterns at different income levels are estimated for rural households in Sierra Leone. Results lend support to the hypothesis that low income households consume goods and services requiring less capital and foreign exchange and more labor than do higher income households. At all income levels households allocate more than 75% of consumption expenditures to goods produced in rural areas. Rural consumption linkages with urban sectors, then, are not well developed.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert P. King & Derek Byerlee, 1978. "Factor Intensities and Locational Linkages of Rural Consumption Patterns in Sierra Leone," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 60(2), pages 197-206.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:60:y:1978:i:2:p:197-206.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1240048
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    Cited by:

    1. Dorosh, Paul & Thurlow, James, 2014. "Can Cities or Towns Drive African Development? Economywide Analysis for Ethiopia and Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 113-123.
    2. Neil McCulloch & C. Peter Timmer & Julian Weisbrod, 2007. "Pathways Out of Poverty During an Economic Crisis: An Empirical Assessment of Rural Indonesia," Working Papers 115, Center for Global Development.
    3. C. Peter Timmer, 2008. "Agriculture and Pro-Poor Growth: An Asian Perspective," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-27, June.
    4. Al-Hassan, Ramatu M. & Diao, Xinshen, 2007. "Regional disparities in Ghana: Policy options and public investment implications," IFPRI discussion papers 693, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Breisinger, Clemens & Ecker, Olivier & Al-Riffai, Perrihan & Robertson, Richard & Thiele, Rainer & Wiebelt, Manfred, 2011. "Climate change, agricultural production and food security: Evidence from Yemen," Kiel Working Papers 1747, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Manfred Wiebelt & Rainer Schweickert & Clemens Breisinger & Marcus Böhme, 2011. "Oil revenues for public investment in Africa: targeting urban or rural areas?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 147(4), pages 745-770, November.
    7. Timmer, Peter & Weisbrod, Julian & McCulloch, Neil, 2006. "The Pathways out of Poverty in Rural Indonesia: an empirical assessment," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2006 29, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    8. repec:eee:wdevel:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:14-26 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter B., 1988. "Prospects for equitable growth in rural sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8, The World Bank.
    10. Masi, Fernando & Setrini, Gustavo & Arce, Lucas & González, Cynthia & Servín, Belén, 2011. "Trade and poverty in Paraguay: the case of an agribusiness value chain," Documentos de Proyectos 417, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    11. Andersson, Martin & Rohne Till, Emelie, 2017. "Between the Engine and the Fifth Wheel: An Analytical Survey of the Shifting Roles of Agriculture in Development Theory," Lund Papers in Economic History 163, Lund University, Department of Economic History.

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