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Does the microsimulation approach used in macro–micro modelling matter? An application to the distributional effects of capital outflows during Argentina's Currency Board regime

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  • Debowicz, Darío

Abstract

We provide a novel comparison between the behavioural and the non-parametric microsimulation approach. Coupled with a CGE model, we consider the distributional effects of the significant capital outflows faced by the Argentinean economy at the end of its Currency Board, in a context with significant macroeconomic similarities to the present crisis in Greece. Both the relatively straightforward ‘non-parametric’ approach and the more complex behavioural approach lead to distributional results that are consistent with the data, suggesting that both are viable alternatives. Looking forward, it would be desirable for researchers to look for additional evidence regarding the distributional effects that these microsimulation models can illuminate for given macroeconomic shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Debowicz, Darío, 2016. "Does the microsimulation approach used in macro–micro modelling matter? An application to the distributional effects of capital outflows during Argentina's Currency Board regime," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 591-599.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:591-599
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2016.01.018
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    Cited by:

    1. Matteo Richiardi & John Cockburn & Hélène Maisonnave & Luca Tiberti, 2016. "Editorial," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 9(1), pages 1-4.
    2. repec:ijm:journl:v11:y:2018:i:2:p:191-213 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic modelling; Macro–micro modelling; CGE; Microsimulations; Income distribution; Argentina;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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