IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/mes/postke/v27y2005i3p507-531.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Financial globalization: the need for a single currency and a global central bank

Author

Listed:
  • PHILIP ARESTIS
  • SANTONU BASU
  • SUSHANTA MALLICK

Abstract

Financial globalization, by definition, means the integration of financial markets of all countries of the world into one. This is only possible provided uniformity can be brought in the terms and conditions across the globe for raising international loans. The existence of different currencies with their different degrees of convertibility prevents uniformity in the terms and the conditions for loans. Consequently, not only does the existence of different currencies act as a barrier to such integration, but it disproportionately benefits the developed countries. This problem can only be eliminated provided a single worldwide currency is introduced. In its absence, financial globalization remains incomplete.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Arestis & Santonu Basu & Sushanta Mallick, 2005. "Financial globalization: the need for a single currency and a global central bank," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 507-531.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:27:y:2005:i:3:p:507-531
    DOI: 10.1080/01603477.2005.11051444
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/01603477.2005.11051444
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Grahame Thompson, 2011. "Financial Globalization? History, Conditions and Prospects," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Debowicz, Darío, 2016. "Does the microsimulation approach used in macro–micro modelling matter? An application to the distributional effects of capital outflows during Argentina's Currency Board regime," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 591-599.
    3. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2011. "The economic policies of the political economy of the Australian patriot and Cambridge economist," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 8(1), pages 129-145.
    4. Andrea Terzi, 2005. "International Financial Instability in a World of Currencies Hierarchy," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Economia e Finanza ief0064, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    5. Gökçer Özgür & Hüseyin Özel, 2013. "Double Movement, Globalization, and the Crisis," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(4), pages 892-916, October.
    6. Degens, Philipp, 2013. "Alternative Geldkonzepte - ein Literaturbericht," MPIfG Discussion Paper 13/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    7. Moshirian, Fariborz, 2008. "Financial services in an increasingly integrated global financial market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(11), pages 2288-2292, November.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:27:y:2005:i:3:p:507-531. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/MPKE20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.