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The economic policies of the political economy of the Australian patriot and Cambridge economist

  • Philip Arestis

    ()

    (University of Cambridge, UK, and University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain)

  • Malcolm Sawyer

    (University of Leeds, UK)

Geoff Harcourt has been a thoroughgoing Keynesian committed to the achievement of sustainable (environmental and otherwise) and equitable (nationally and internationally) economic development and growth, and full employment of the available labour force. Achieving such an objective would require, inter alia, the maintenance of a high level of aggregate demand consistent with the full employment of labour, and the provision of sufficient productive capacity to enable that full employment, where sufficient is to be interpreted in terms of quantity, quality and geographical distribution. In this paper the ways in which fiscal policy should be used to sustain high levels of aggregate demand, necessary though not sufficient for full employment, are explored. Geoff has been a long-standing advocate of incomes policies to contain inflation without resorting to demand deflation. We argue that with the failures of inflation targeting, itself based on demand deflation, the need to develop incomes policies should again be on the policy agenda. This is an important ingredient in Geoff Harcourt’s economic policy toolkit.

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Article provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its journal Intervention. European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies.

Volume (Year): 8 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 129-145

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Handle: RePEc:elg:ejeepi:v:8:y:2011:i:1:p129-145
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elgaronline.com/ejeep

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  1. Jérôme Creel & Paola Monperrus-Veroni & Francesco Saraceno, 2009. "On The Long-Term Effects Of Fiscal Policy In The United Kingdom: The Case For A Golden Rule," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 56(5), pages 580-607, November.
  2. David Aschauer, 1988. "Does public capital crowd out private capital?," Staff Memoranda 88-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 1999. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," NBER Working Papers 7269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Eisner, Robert, 1989. "Budget Deficits: Rhetoric and Reality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 73-93, Spring.
  5. Philip Arestis & Santonu Basu & Sushanta Mallick, 2005. "Financial globalization: the need for a single currency and a global central bank," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 27(3), pages 507-531, April.
  6. Easterly, William & Rebelo, Sergio, 1993. "Fiscal policy and economic growth: An empirical investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 417-458, December.
  7. Erenburg, S. J. & Wohar, Mark E., 1995. "Public and private investment: Are there causal linkages?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-30.
  8. Atish Ghosh & Steven Phillips, 1998. "Warning: Inflation May Be Harmful to Your Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(4), pages 672-710, December.
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