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Intergenerational Earnings and Income Mobility in Spain

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  • María Cervini-Plá

Abstract

type="main"> This paper contributes to the large number of studies on intergenerational earnings and income mobility by providing new evidence for Spain. Since there are no Spanish surveys covering long-term information on both children and their fathers' income or earnings, we deal with this selection problem using the two-sample two-stage least squares estimator. We find that intergenerational mobility in Spain is similar to that in France, lower than in the Nordic countries and Britain, and higher than in Italy and the United States. Furthermore, we use the Chadwick and Solon approach to explore intergenerational mobility in the case of daughters and we find similar results by gender.

Suggested Citation

  • María Cervini-Plá, 2015. "Intergenerational Earnings and Income Mobility in Spain," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(4), pages 812-828, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:61:y:2015:i:4:p:812-828
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/roiw.12130
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    Cited by:

    1. María Cervini-Plá, 2013. "Exploring the Sources of Earnings Transmission in Spain," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 204(1), pages 45-66, March.
    2. Irene Brunetti & Davide Fiaschi, 2015. "Occupational Mobility across Generations: a Theoretical Model with an Application to Italy," Discussion Papers 2015/205, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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