IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Occupational Mobility across Generations: a Theoretical Model with an Application to Italy

Listed author(s):
  • Irene Brunetti
  • Davide Fiaschi

In this paper we study the decision of rms operating in areas where organised crime is pervasive to resist the extortion racket. To this purpose we design a case-control study starting from the unique ex-perience of Addiopizzo (AP), an NGO operating in Palermo (Sicily) which, from 2004, invites rms to resist to the racketeers and join a public list aimed at eliciting critical consumption in favour of rms in the list. We study the determinants of the decision to join AP by estimating a two-level logistic regression model. We nd that rm's total assets and rm's age have a negative effect on the probability of joining AP, while a higher level of human capital embodied in the rm and a higher number of employees increases such probability. Among the district-level variables, we nd that the share of district population reduces the probability to join, while a higher level of socio-economic development, including education levels, increase the probability. We posit that these results support the hypothesis that the decision to join AP is based on a cost-bene t analysis and discuss policy implications of our results. This paper proposes a simple theoretical model to identify the main determinants of intergenerational occupational mobility with an application to Italian data. We assume that occupational mobility is described by a Markov matrix and that three factor affect the occupational choice of an individual: the income incentives of each occupation, the family background and the occupational structure. The empirical application of the proposed model to a sample of Italian families describes Italy as a less mobile country, and in particular we show that occupational mobility decreases for children born between 1966 and 1976. This result is due to the worsening of opportunities. The estimate of three synthetic indexes confirms the decease of mobility.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.ec.unipi.it/documents/Ricerca/papers/2015-205.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy in its series Discussion Papers with number 2015/205.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 01 Aug 2015
Handle: RePEc:pie:dsedps:2015/205
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Via Cosimo Ridolfi, 10 - 56124 PISA

Phone: +39 050 22 16 466
Fax: +39 050 22 16 384
Web page: http://www.ec.unipi.it
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Mocetti Sauro, 2007. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in Italy," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-25, December.
  2. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 257-298 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Anders Björklund & Markus Jäntti, 2000. "Intergenerational mobility of socio-economic status in comparative perspective," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 26, pages 3-32.
  4. Durlauf, Steven N, 1996. "A Theory of Persistent Income Inequality," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 75-93, March.
  5. Mark Granovetter, 2005. "The Impact of Social Structure on Economic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 33-50, Winter.
  6. Daniele Checchi, 1997. "Education and Intergenerational Mobility in Occupations," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 66(1), pages 136-144.
  7. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
  8. Solon, Gary, 1992. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 393-408, June.
  9. María Cervini-Plá, 2015. "Intergenerational Earnings and Income Mobility in Spain," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(4), pages 812-828, December.
  10. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1979. "An Equilibrium Theory of the Distribution of Income and Intergenerational Mobility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1153-1189, December.
  11. Veronika V. Eberharter, 2013. "The Intergenerational Dynamics of Social Inequality: Empirical Evidence from Europe and the United States," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 588, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  12. Zimmerman, David J, 1992. "Regression toward Mediocrity in Economic Stature," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 409-429, June.
  13. Giorgio Di Pietro & Peter Urwin, 2003. "Intergenerational mobility and occupational status in Italy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(12), pages 793-797.
  14. Formby, John P. & Smith, W. James & Zheng, Buhong, 2004. "Mobility measurement, transition matrices and statistical inference," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 181-205, May.
  15. Franzini Maurizio & Raitano Michele & Vona Francesco, 2013. "The channels of intergenerational transmission of inequality: a cross-country comparison," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 201-226.
  16. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-1024, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pie:dsedps:2015/205. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.