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Health, Wealth, Fertility, Education, and Inequality

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  • David Fielding
  • Sebastian Torres

Abstract

The authors use a new cross-country dataset to estimate the strength of the links between different dimensions of social and economic development, including indicators of health, fertility, and education, as well as material wellbeing. This differs from previous studies in employing data for different income groups in each country in order to provide direct evidence on factors driving inequality, and in using a unique measure of material wellbeing that does not rely on PPP comparisons. Copyright © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • David Fielding & Sebastian Torres, 2009. "Health, Wealth, Fertility, Education, and Inequality," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 39-55, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:13:y:2009:i:1:p:39-55
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-9361.2008.00460.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. S. Baranzoni & P. Bianchi & L. Lambertini, 2000. "Multiproduct Firms, Product Differentiation, and Market Structure," Working Papers 368, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schumacher, Ingmar, 2009. "Endogenous discounting via wealth, twin-peaks and the role of technology," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 78-80, May.
    2. Schumacher, Ingmar, 2011. "Endogenous discounting and the domain of the felicity function," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 574-581, January.
    3. Mark McGillivray & David Fielding & Sebastian Torres & Stephen Knowles, 2011. "Does Aid Work for the Poor?," Working Papers 1114, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2011.
    4. Ana Poças & Elias Soukiazis, 2013. "Explaining the interrelations between health, education and standards of living in Portugal. A simultaneous equation approach," International Journal of Public Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 9(3), pages 167-187.
    5. Warning, Susanne & Dürrenberger, Nicole, 2015. "Corruption and education: Does public financing of higher education matter?," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112836, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Thierry Bréchet & Natali Hritonenko & Yuri Yatsenko, 2013. "Adaptation and Mitigation in Long-term Climate Policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(2), pages 217-243, June.
    7. Fielding, David & McGillivray, Mark & Torres, Sebastian, 2006. "A Wider Approach to Aid Effectiveness: Correlated Impacts on Health, Wealth, Fertility and Education," WIDER Working Paper Series 023, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Ingmar, SCHUMACHER, 2006. "On optimality, endogeneous discounting and wealth accumulation," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2006058, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
    9. Baliamoune–Lutz, Mina & McGillivray, Mark, 2015. "The impact of gender inequality in education on income in Africa and the Middle East," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 1-11.
    10. repec:eee:mateco:v:73:y:2017:i:c:p:34-43 is not listed on IDEAS

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