IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ags/inrace/206206.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Meat consumers’ long-term response to perceived risks associated with BSE in Great Britain

Author

Listed:
  • Burton, Michael
  • Young, Trevor
  • Cromb, Roy

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to review the empirical evidence of the scale of the long-term impact of BSE on meat consumption in Great-Britain. The first two studies reviewed specified a dynamic demand system for 4 meats, using quarterly National Food Survey data for the period 1961:Q1 to 1995:Q4. The results suggest that as a consequence of BSE some portion of the beef market has been irretrievably lost and that this finding is robust. The second body of empirical work reviewed here was undertaken on behalf of the Meat and Livestock Commission (MMD,1997). Using four-weekly data from Audits of Great Britain, for the period January 1988 to March 1997, the analysis gives broadly comparable short-run shifts in the meat expenditure shares due to BSE, and indicates that there has been a long-run loss in the market, but the effect is not as great as would have been implied by the earlier models.

Suggested Citation

  • Burton, Michael & Young, Trevor & Cromb, Roy, 1999. "Meat consumers’ long-term response to perceived risks associated with BSE in Great Britain," Cahiers d'Economie et de Sociologie Rurales (CESR), Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), vol. 50.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:inrace:206206
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.206206
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/206206/files/CESR-50-7-19.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Giancarlo Moschini & Karl D. Meilke, 1989. "Modeling the Pattern of Structural Change in U.S. Meat Demand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 71(2), pages 253-261.
    2. Deaton, Angus, 1988. "Quality, Quantity, and Spatial Variation of Price," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 418-430, June.
    3. Martin, William J. & Porter, Darrell, 1985. "Testing For Changes In The Structure Of The Demand For Meat In Australia," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16, April.
    4. Moschini, Giancarlo & Moro, Daniele, 1996. "Structural Change and Demand Analysis: A Cursory Review," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 239-261.
    5. Yen, Steven T & Jensen, Helen H & Wang, Qingbin, 1996. "Cholesterol Information and Egg Consumption in the US: A Nonnormal and Hetroscedastic Double-Hurdle Model," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 343-356.
    6. Deborah J. Brown & Lee F. Schrader, 1990. "Cholesterol Information and Shell Egg Consumption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 72(3), pages 548-555.
    7. Tansel, A., 1992. "Cigarette Demand, Health Scares and Education in Turkey," Papers 660, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Panos Fousekis & Brian J. Revell, 2002. "Primary Demand for Red Meats in the United Kingdom," Cahiers d'Economie et Sociologie Rurales, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 63, pages 31-50.
    2. Patricia Bossard & Yves Léon & Maurice Quinqu & Yves Surry, 2000. "La filière bovine en Bretagne et la crise de la « vache folle » de 1996 : une analyse interindustrielle," Cahiers d'Economie et Sociologie Rurales, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 57, pages 51-93.
    3. repec:rae:jourae:v:96:y:2015:i:1:p:187-237 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:ags:frraes:189338 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Corsi, Alessandro, 2012. "Willingness-to-pay in terms of price: an application to organic beef during and after the “mad cow” crisis," Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, Editions NecPlus, vol. 92(01), pages 25-46, October.
    6. Eric Giraud-Héraud & Maria Aguiar Fontes & Alexandra Seabra Pinto, 2014. "Crise sanitaires de l'alimentation et analyses comportementales," Working Papers hal-00949126, HAL.
    7. Jin, Hyun Joung, 2008. "Changes in South Korean consumers' preferences for meat," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 74-84, February.
    8. repec:ags:frraes:276765 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Xavier IRZ & Mario MAZZOCCHI & Vincent RÉQUILLART & Louis-Georges SOLER, 2015. "Research in Food Economics: past trends and new challenges," Review of Agricultural and Environmental Studies - Revue d'Etudes en Agriculture et Environnement, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 96(1), pages 187-237.
    10. Walters, Lurleen M. & Jones, Keithly G., 2016. "Caribbean Food Import Demand: An Application of the CBS Differential Demand System," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 47(2), pages 1-19, July.
    11. Rezitis, Anthony N. & Stavropoulos, Konstantinos S., 2010. "Modeling beef supply response and price volatility under CAP reforms: The case of Greece," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 163-174, April.
    12. Thomas Marsh & Ted Schroeder & James Mintert, 2004. "Impacts of meat product recalls on consumer demand in the USA," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(9), pages 897-909.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:inrace:206206. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/inratfr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.