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The BSE crisis and the price of red meat in the UK

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  • John Leeming
  • Paul Turner

Abstract

This paper presents estimates of price functions for beef, lamb and pork for the UK economy which allow for the effects of the 1996 BSE crisis. The estimates illustrate the importance of allowing for the joint endogeneity of prices in these markets. This shown that the effects of this crisis had a significant negative effect on the price of beef and a positive and significant effect on the price of lamb. However, there appears to have been little effect on the price of pork.

Suggested Citation

  • John Leeming & Paul Turner, 2004. "The BSE crisis and the price of red meat in the UK," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(16), pages 1825-1829.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:36:y:2004:i:16:p:1825-1829
    DOI: 10.1080/0003684042000227868
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Panos Fousekis & Brian J. Revell, 2002. "Primary Demand for Red Meats in the United Kingdom," Cahiers d'Economie et Sociologie Rurales, INRA Department of Economics, vol. 63, pages 31-50.
    2. Dnes, Antony W, 1996. "An Economic Analysis of the BSE Scare," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 343-348, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oral Capps Jr. & Sergio Colinā€Castillo & Manuel A. Hernandez, 2013. "Do Marketing Margins Change with Food Scares? Examining the Effects of Food Recalls and Disease Outbreaks in the U.S. Red Meat Industry," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(4), pages 426-454, September.
    2. repec:taf:applec:v:50:y:2018:i:9:p:1022-1042 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Kim, Jae H. & Fraser, Iain & Hyndman, Rob J., 2011. "Improved interval estimation of long run response from a dynamic linear model: A highest density region approach," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 2477-2489, August.
    4. Moonsoo Park & Yanhong H. Jin & David A. Bessler, 2008. "The impacts of animal disease crises on the Korean meat market," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(2), pages 183-195, September.
    5. Assefa, Tsion & Meuwissen, Miranda & Lansink, Alfons G.J.M., 2015. "Food scares and price volatility: the case of German and Spanish pig chains," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210966, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Takashi Ishida & Noriko Ishikawa & Mototsugu Fukushige, 2010. "Impact of BSE and bird flu on consumers' meat demand in Japan," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 49-56.
    7. Dai, Jiawu & Li, Xun & Wang, Xiuqing & Yu, Qiushuo & Mao, Xiaojie, 2015. "Food Scares, Market Power and Farm-Retail Price Spread: The Case of Pork Market in China," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205121, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Hyun Joung Jin & Jang-Chul Kim, 2008. "The effects of the BSE outbreak on the security values of US agribusiness and food processing firms," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 357-372.
    9. M. P. McCullough & T. L. Marsh & R. Huffaker, 2013. "Reconstructing market reactions to consumption harms," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 173-179, February.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices

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