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Knowledge, Technology and Innovations for a Bio-based Economy: Lessons from the Past, Challenges for the Future

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  • Esposti, Roberto

Abstract

The paper presents an evolutionary perspective on how Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation Systems (AKIS) have adapted over time to new challenges and technological paradigm and trajectories. Starting from a conventional science-based approach and the robust empirical evidence supporting it, the analysis highlights the emergence of some system failures and the need for new conceptualization and design of the AKIS. Particularly concentrating on developed countries’ agenda, we then discuss how, along this evolutionary pattern, bioeconomy emerges as the convergence of traditional sectors as a result of these new technological trajectories. Finally, some implications for the EU policies are drawn.

Suggested Citation

  • Esposti, Roberto, 0. "Knowledge, Technology and Innovations for a Bio-based Economy: Lessons from the Past, Challenges for the Future," Bio-based and Applied Economics Journal, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA), issue 3.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aieabj:146275
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural knowledge and innovation system; productivity; R&D; bioeconomy; Productivity Analysis; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Q16; O30;

    JEL classification:

    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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