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Causes Of Rural Economic Development

  • Gardner, Bruce L.

This paper investigates the sources of growth in agricultural value-added (GDP) and rural household incomes using a sample of developing countries. The main factors are: (i) providing macroeconomic and political stability; (ii) institutions establishing property rights and incentives; (iii) access to competitive input markets and remunerative output markets; and (iv) adoption of productivity-enhancing technology, and (v) real income growth in the non-agricultural economy. The evidence indicates a surprisingly large role of the fifth of these.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/28559
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Paper provided by University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics in its series Working Papers with number 28559.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:ags:umdrwp:28559
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  1. Lele, Uma, 1989. "Sources of Growth in East African Agriculture," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 3(1), pages 119-44, January.
  2. Yair Mundlak, 2001. "Explaining Economic Growth," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1154-1167.
  3. Hazell, P. B. R. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2001. "Agricultural research and poverty reduction:," 2020 vision discussion papers 34, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Fulginiti, Lilyan E. & Perrin, Richard K., 1993. "Prices and Productivity in Agriculture," Staff General Research Papers 773, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  5. Ravallion, Martin & Datt, Gaurav, 2002. "Why has economic growth been more pro-poor in some states of India than others?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 381-400, August.
  6. Alston, Julian M. & Wyatt, T. J. & Pardey, Philip G. & Marra, Michele C. & Chan-Kang, Connie, 2000. "A meta-analysis of rates of return to agricultural R & D: ex pede Herculem?," Research reports 113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Barbara J. Craig & Philip G. Pardey & Johannes Roseboom, 1997. "International Productivity Patterns: Accounting for Input Quality, Infrastructure, and Research," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1064-1076.
  8. Frisvold, George & Ingram, Kevin, 1995. "Sources of agricultural productivity growth and stagnation in sub-Saharan Africa," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 51-61, October.
  9. Gene M. Grossman (ed.), 1996. "Economic Growth," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, volume 0, number 553, 8.
  10. Deaton, Angus, 1995. "Data and econometric tools for development analysis," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 33, pages 1785-1882 Elsevier.
  11. Antle, John M, 1983. "Infrastructure and Aggregate Agricultural Productivity: International Evidence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(3), pages 609-19, April.
  12. Bruce L. Gardner, 2000. "Economic Growth and Low Incomes in Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1059-1074.
  13. Nick Vink & Gavin Williams & Johann Kirsten, 2004. "South Africa," Chapters, in: The World's Wine Markets, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    • Johann Kirsten & Julian May & Sheryl Hendriks & Charles L. Machethe & Cecelia Punt & Mike Lyne, 2007. "South Africa," Chapters, in: Beyond Food Production, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  14. Timmer, C. Peter, 2002. "Agriculture and economic development," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 29, pages 1487-1546 Elsevier.
  15. Quah, Danny T., 1996. "Empirics for economic growth and convergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1353-1375, June.
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