IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/saeana/45903.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Employment Growth in the Rural South: Do Sectors Matter?

Author

Listed:
  • Bukenya, James O.

Abstract

The paper contributes to the understanding of the role of economic sectors in employment growth by examining the extent to which sectoral employment influence employment development in the rural southeast United States over the period 1970 through 2007. The analysis employs two specifications of OLS regression to understand the role of economic sectors in employment growth processes. The first specification (number of jobs) explained approximately 36 percent of the variability in employment growth while the second specification (number of enterprises) explained roughly 43 percent of the variability over the studied period. Overall, the results suggest that although the share and the social role of agriculture are shrinking in almost all rural areas, agriculture is still an important sector in rural employment growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Bukenya, James O., 2009. "Employment Growth in the Rural South: Do Sectors Matter?," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 45903, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saeana:45903
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/45903
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mann, Stefan, 2006. "Population development in rural Switzerland: Do sectors matter?," Working Papers 30710, Agroscope Reckenholz Tanikon (ART).
    2. Daniel C. Monchuk & John A. Miranowski & Dermot J. Hayes & Bruce A. Babcock, 2007. "An Analysis of Regional Economic Growth in the U.S. Midwest," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 29(1), pages 17-39.
    3. Steven C. Deller & Tsung-Hsiu (Sue) Tsai & David W. Marcouiller & Donald B.K. English, 2001. "The Role of Amenities and Quality of Life In Rural Economic Growth," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(2), pages 352-365.
    4. Glaeser, Edward L & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(6), pages 1126-1152, December.
      • Edward L. Glaeser & Hedi D. Kallal & Jose A. Scheinkman & Andrei Shleifer, 1991. "Growth in Cities," NBER Working Papers 3787, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Kallal, Hedi D. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Scholarly Articles 3451309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    5. Bruce L. Gardner, 2005. "Causes of rural economic development," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(s1), pages 21-41, January.
    6. Miranowski, John & Monchuk, Daniel C., 2004. "Spatial Labor Markets and Technology Spillovers - Analysis from the US Midwest," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12196, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    7. Timothy J. Bartik, 2007. "Solving the Problems of Economic Development Incentives," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers,in: Ann Markusen (ed.), Reining in the Competition for Capital, chapter 5, pages 103-139 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    8. Aldrich, Lorna M. & Kusmin, Lorin D., 1997. "Rural Economic Development: What Makes Rural Communities Grow?," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33677, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. repec:oup:revage:v:29:y:2007:i:1:p:17-39. is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Rosegrant, Mark W. & Hazell, Peter B. R., 2001. "Transforming the rural Asian economy," 2020 vision briefs 69, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Community/Rural/Urban Development; Labor and Human Capital;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:saeana:45903. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/saeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.