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Employment Growth in the Rural South: Do Sectors Matter?

  • Bukenya, James O.
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    The paper contributes to the understanding of the role of economic sectors in employment growth by examining the extent to which sectoral employment influence employment development in the rural southeast United States over the period 1970 through 2007. The analysis employs two specifications of OLS regression to understand the role of economic sectors in employment growth processes. The first specification (number of jobs) explained approximately 36 percent of the variability in employment growth while the second specification (number of enterprises) explained roughly 43 percent of the variability over the studied period. Overall, the results suggest that although the share and the social role of agriculture are shrinking in almost all rural areas, agriculture is still an important sector in rural employment growth.

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    Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia with number 45903.

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    Date of creation: 17 Jan 2009
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:saeana:45903
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    1. Monchuk, Daniel C. & Miranowski, John A. & Hayes, Dermot J. & Babcock, Bruce A., 2004. "An Analysis Of Regional Economic Growth In The Us Midwest," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20369, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Timothy J. Bartik, 2005. "Solving the Problems of Economic Development Incentives," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 139-166.
    3. Gardner, Bruce L., 2003. "Causes Of Rural Economic Development," Working Papers 28559, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    4. Rosegrant, Mark W. & Hazell, Peter B. R., 2001. "Transforming the rural Asian economy," 2020 vision briefs 69, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Glaeser, Edward Ludwig & Kallal, Hedi D. & Scheinkman, Jose A. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1992. "Growth in Cities," Scholarly Articles 3451309, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    6. Aldrich, Lorna M. & Kusmin, Lorin D., 1997. "Rural Economic Development: What Makes Rural Communities Grow?," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33677, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. Miranowski, John & Monchuk, Daniel C., 2004. "Spatial Labor Markets and Technology Spillovers - Analysis from the US Midwest," Staff General Research Papers 12196, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Mann, Stefan, 2006. "Population development in rural Switzerland: Do sectors matter?," Working Papers 30710, Agroscope Reckenholz Tanikon (ART).
    9. Steven C. Deller & Tsung-Hsiu (Sue) Tsai & David W. Marcouiller & Donald B.K. English, 2001. "The Role of Amenities and Quality of Life In Rural Economic Growth," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(2), pages 352-365.
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