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Job Training, Remote Working, and Self-Employment: Displaced Workers Beyond Employment Hysteresis

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  • Focacci, Chiara Natalie
  • Santarelli, Enrico

Abstract

The recent SARS-Cov-2 pandemic has contributed to several corporate crises. As a result, many Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) in Italy have filed for bankruptcy in the first quarter of 2020. In addition to a gigantic macroeconomic effect, the lockdown has impacted individuals to a large ex- tent. In this article, we investigate the behavioural response of employees who are under a dual condition of stress; namely, the pandemic and the risk of job loss. The hypothesis of employment hysteresis is challenged by looking at the tendency of individuals who are employed in firms facing a crisis, or in diffi- culty, to participate in training measures for: a similar job, remote working, and self-employment. Findings from a seemingly unrelated regressions (SUR) model show a significant increase in the likelihood to participate in standard or high-commitment training measures for similar jobs and remote working for employees who: i) positively value their professional social capital, i.e. their membership in a trade union (+24.4 and +25.2 percentage points, respectively); ii) have some displaced colleagues (+29.6 and +40.7 percentage points, respec- tively). Finally, we find that employees with a lower educational background are less likely to consider the possibility of switching between occupations.

Suggested Citation

  • Focacci, Chiara Natalie & Santarelli, Enrico, 2021. "Job Training, Remote Working, and Self-Employment: Displaced Workers Beyond Employment Hysteresis," GLO Discussion Paper Series 780, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:780
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corporate Crisis; Displaced Workers; Employment Hysteresis; Job Training; Self-Employment; SARS-Cov-2; Remote Working;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • M53 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Training

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