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Identifying Revealed Comparative Advantages in an EU Regional Context

Author

Listed:
  • Alexander Cordes
  • Birgit Gehrke
  • Christian Rammer
  • Roman Römisch

    () (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw)

  • Paula Schliessler
  • Pia Wassmann

Abstract

Abstract This study introduces a suitable method to break down national trade data to the regional level. This allows producing trade indicators at the regional level, revealed export advantages in particular. Identifying industries in which a region realises a strong trade specialisation plays a twofold role in industrial and regional policy-making. Firstly, identifying successful structures at the industry-region level helps to improve the understanding of micro- and meso-foundations for competitiveness as well as scope and cases for policy intervention. Secondly, knowledge of the spatial distribution of competitive industries and required location factors is necessary for differentiated perspectives on future economic development and the choice of policy instruments. The study applies descriptive, econometric and case study analysis to identify regional patterns of trade specialisation, as well as region- and industry-specific factors related to success in international markets. Based on the results obtained, the study develops conclusions for EU regional and smart specialisation policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Cordes & Birgit Gehrke & Christian Rammer & Roman Römisch & Paula Schliessler & Pia Wassmann, 2016. "Identifying Revealed Comparative Advantages in an EU Regional Context," wiiw Research Reports 412, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  • Handle: RePEc:wii:rpaper:rr:412
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    EU regions; regional foreign trade; EU regional policy; smart specialisation strategies; regional competitiveness; determinants of competitiveness;

    JEL classification:

    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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