IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Inflation gifts and endogenous growth through learning-by-doing

  • Andrea Vaona

    ()

    (Department of Economics (University of Verona))

We investigate the link between inflation, growth and unemployment nesting a model of fair wages into one of endogenous growth of learning by doing and assuming that firms protect wages' purchasing power against inflation in exchange of worker's effort. Unemployment decreases with higher inflation and real growth rates. These effects tends to vanish as inflation and growth increase. Depending on the assumptions on learning-by-doing mechanisms, the effect of inflation on growth can be either nil or positive, but tiny. The Appendix shows that the short run effects of a monetary shocks mirror the long-run effects of inflation.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://dse.univr.it/home/workingpapers/Inflationgiftssent.pdf
File Function: First version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Verona, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 09/2013.

as
in new window

Length: 0
Date of creation: May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ver:wpaper:09/2013
Contact details of provider: Postal: Vicolo Campofiore, 2 - I-37129 Verona
Phone: +390458028097
Fax: +390458028486
Web page: http://www.dse.univr.it
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Marika Karanassou & Hector Sala & Dennis J. Snower, 2008. "The Evolution Of Inflation And Unemployment: Explaining The Roaring Nineties," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(4), pages 334-354, December.
  2. Jean-Pierre DANTHINE & André KURMANN, 2007. "The Business Cycle Implications of Reciprocity in Labor Relations," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 07.12, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  3. Blanchard, Olivier J & Galí, Jordi, 2008. "Labour Markets and Monetary Policy: A New Keynesian Model with Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 6765, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Robert J. Barro, 2012. "Inflation and Economic Growth," CEMA Working Papers 568, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
  5. Jean-Pierre Danthine & André Kurmann, 2003. "Fair Wages in a New Keynesian Model of the Business Cycle," Cahiers de recherche 0320, CIRPEE.
  6. Annicchiarico, Barbara & Pelloni, Alessandra & Lorenza, Rossi, 2010. "Endogenous Growth, Monetary Shocks and Nominal Rigidities," MPRA Paper 25647, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Graham, Liam & Snower, Dennis J., 2008. "Hyperbolic Discounting and the Phillips Curve," IZA Discussion Papers 3477, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Feenstra, Robert C., 1986. "Functional equivalence between liquidity costs and the utility of money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 271-291, March.
  9. Ascari, Guido, 1998. "Superneutrality Of Money In Staggered Wage-Setting Models," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(03), pages 383-400, September.
  10. Marika Karanassou & Hector Sala & Dennis Snower, 2007. "Long-Run Inflation-Unemployment Dynamics: The Spanish Phillips Curve and Economic Policy," Kiel Working Papers 1326, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  11. Alexopoulos, Michelle, 2004. "Unemployment and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 277-298, March.
  12. Max Gillman & Michal Kejak, 2005. "Contrasting Models of the Effect of Inflation on Growth," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 113-136, 02.
  13. Danthine, Jean-Pierre & Kurmann, Andre, 2005. "The Macroeconomic Consequences of Reciprocity in Labour Relations," CEPR Discussion Papers 5174, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Alexopoulos, Michelle, 2007. "A monetary business cycle model with unemployment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 3904-3940, December.
  15. Andrea Vaona, 2010. "Inflation and Growth in the Long Run: A New Keynesian Theory and Further Semiparametric Evidence," Working Papers 09/2010, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
  16. Andrea Vaona, 2010. "Six variations on fair wages and the long-run Phillips curve," Working Papers 17/2010, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
  17. Graham, Liam & Snower, Dennis J., 2004. "The real effects of money growth in dynamic general equilibrium," Working Paper Series 0412, European Central Bank.
  18. Andrea Vaona, 2013. "The Most Beautiful Variations on Fair Wages and the Phillips Curve," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(6), pages 1069-1084, 09.
  19. Merz, Monika, 1995. "Search in the labor market and the real business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 269-300, November.
  20. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521314275 is not listed on IDEAS
  21. Michelle Alexopoulos, 2006. "Shirking in a monetary business cycle model," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(3), pages 689-718, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ver:wpaper:09/2013. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael Reiter)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.