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Endogenous growth, monetary shocks and nominal rigidities

  • Annicchiarico, Barbara
  • Pelloni, Alessandra
  • Rossi, Lorenza

We introduce endogenous growth in a standard NK model with staggered prices and wages. We find that the source of nominal rigidities, the shock persistence and the type of Taylor rule affect the relationship between monetary volatility and growth.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 113 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 103-107

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:113:y:2011:i:2:p:103-107
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